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Тексты для чтения с упражнениями для подготовки к ЕГЭ (10-11 класс)

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SAMPLE QUESTIONS. READING. COMPREHENSION.


Unit I.

Detective stories.


TEST 1


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. b


5, 000 Bank Robbery in the City.

There was a bank robbery in central London yesterday. Just before closing time yesterday, a man __1__ the Butcher Street Branch of the National Westminster Bank. He was carrying a shotgun, and wearing a stocking mask over his head. There were only a few customers in the bank at the time. He __2__ on the floor, and forced the manager to put the money in a sack. __3__ he was leaving, the security guard tried to ring the alarm. The robber shot him and the guard is now in St. Patrick’s Hospital. Surgeons are trying to save __4__.

_5__ the police arrested a man in South London. He is now trying to prove his alibi.

      1. a) entered in b) entered c) left d) was entering

      2. a) made them to lie b) made them lying c) Made lie to them d) made them lie

      3. a) as b) as soon as c) after d) before

      4. a) him alive b) his death c) his life d) his from death

      5. a) last at night b) late night c) lastly night d) last night



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


      1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. There weren’t many customers in the Bank when the robber came.

  2. Just before closing time yesterday, a man came into the Butcher Street Branch of the National Westminster Bank and deposited € 5,000.

  3. When the man went into the Bank, he was carrying a shotgun.

  4. 5,000 was stolen from the National Westminster Bank yesterday.

      1. When did the robbery happen?

  1. At midnight a day ago.

  2. Three hours before closing time of the Bank.

  3. Just before the Bank opened.

  4. Shortly before closing time of the Bank yesterday.

      1. How many customers were there in the Bank when the robbery happened?

  1. There weren’t many customers there.

  2. The Bank was packed with customers.

  3. There was only one customer there.

  4. There were quite a few customers in the Bank.

      1. Why did the robber shoot the security guard?

  1. The security guard wanted to escape with the sack full of money.

  2. The security guard asked the manager not to put the money in the sack.

  3. The security guard tried to ring the alarm.

  4. The security guard didn’t put the money in a sack.

      1. Whom did the police arrest last week?

  1. The manager of the bank.

  2. The robber.

  3. The security guard who didn’t manage to ring the alarm.

  4. A man trying to prove that he didn’t rob the bank.


TEST 2


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. b


What’s a Brueghel?

Many stolen paintings have a strange history. But one of the strangest was __1__ of a painting by the famous sixteenth-century painter Brueghel, stolen from the Court auld Institute in London in the eighties.

The four thieves who had stolen the painting, didn’t know how much it cost. The first art expert who came to see the painting said it was __2__ and couldn’t name the exact price. The gang telephoned another art expert who told them that the painting was worth €2-3 million. They then tried to sell the painting __3__ to the gallery from which it had been stolen. The gallery contacted the police and a meeting was arranged. The gang asked for the money to be brought in two suitcases in unmarked banknotes. __4__, the meeting didn’t take place.

A short time __5__ the four were arrested. The police found the painting on top of a wardrobe. When the gangs were told they were arrested in connection with Brueghel, one of them said, “What’s a Brueghel? I thought it was rubbish.”


              1. A) this b) that c) those d) the

              2. A) priceless b) colorless c) hopeless d) useless

              3. A) against b) round c) back d) around

              4. A) so b) while c) sure d) however

              5. A) latter b) late c) before d) later



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


              1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. There was no meeting of the gang with the gallery representatives because there was no place for шею

  2. The four thieves didn’t know the real value of the painting when they stole it.

  3. Representatives of the gallery were asked to bring the money.

  4. The meeting of the gang with gallery representatives was planned.

              1. What’s a Brueghel?

  1. An inmarked banknote.

  2. The amous sixteenth-century painter.

  3. A painting by Brueghel.

  4. A mark on top of the wardrobe.

              1. Why didn’t the first expert name the exact price?

  1. The gallery didn’t allow him to do шею

  2. He didn’t want to deal with the gang.

  3. He thought it was too valuable to be priced.

  4. He wanted to have the painting himself.

              1. What is the text about?

  1. The Brueghel’s painting – stolen and found.

  2. Strange history.

  3. London of the eighties.

  4. Stolen paintings by Brueghel.

10. The word gang means:

  1. A small but friendly company

  2. A group of persons going about of working, especially for criminal purposes.

  3. A room or a building for the display of painting.

  4. A group of prisoners.


TEST 3


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. b


Mr. Reilly?

Mr. Reilly? This is Colonel Montgomery of Scotland Yard. I’m afraid I have some bad news for you. Your brother-in-law has just been murdered.”

Oh, my God,” said the voice __1__ end of the line. “I only saw Mickey last night. I can’t believe this is true. Are you sure it’s him?”

The __2__ is positive, Mr. Reilly. I would like to come straight over and talk to you about who would have a motive for killing him.”

It’s no secret that Mickey had enemies,” said Reilly. His business partner, Harold Smith, once __3__ him of stealing money from their business. They had some violent arguments. Then there’s my sister’s husband, Charles Johns, who thought Mickey had __4__ with his wife. Charles, I am embarrassed to say, is associated with the underworld. Another person who could have killed Mickey is my wife’s brother Billy...

There was no need to continue. From what Mr. Reilly said everything was obvious. He gave himself __5__ when he mentioned the name of his murdered brother-in-law: he had at least three brothers-in-law.


  1. A) another b) the other c) other d) an other

  2. A) identification b) confirmation c) interrogation d) location

  3. A) deceived b) proved c) accused d) thought

  4. A) love b) affair c) heavens d) peace

  5. A) off b) from c) back d) away

PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Murder was committed and Colonel Montgomery was to investigate the crime.

  2. Colonel Montgomery was afraid to break the news to Mr. Reilly.

  3. Mr. Reilly was positive he saw his brother-in-law the day before.

  4. Colonel Montgomery was an efficient investigator.

  1. Mr. Reilly was the only person who:

  1. Had an alibi.

  2. Recognized the murderer.

  3. Was guilty.

  4. Had a motive for murder.

  1. Judging by Mr. Reilly’s evidence:

  1. He had the motive to kill Mickey.

  2. It was impossible to solve the crime.

  3. Mickey was murdered by his brother-in-law.

  4. He had connections with the underworld.

  1. Who murdered Mickey?

  1. Charles.

  2. Billy.

  3. Mr. Reilly.

  4. At least three brothers-in-law.

  1. The word underworld means:

  1. The world “down under”.

  2. The world full of ghosts and goblins.

  3. The world of mystery and magic.

  4. Part of society that lives by vice and crime.












TEST 4


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. b


One evening...

One evening late in 1941, Colonel Montgomery of Scotland Yard, __1__ himself standing before the members of the London Mystery Club, a group that enjoyed discussing mystery novels.

Recently a stranger arrived in London from South America,” the colonel said. “Our sources have informed us that this man is probably a Nazi agent. We believe that he is __2__ of a great deal of wealth with which to finance espionage in Britain.

A few hours after he stepped __3__ the boat we arranged a car accident that sent him to hospital with a fractured arm. Our staff searched his clothes and luggage, which consisted of only a briefcase with letters from his friends in British Guiana. We considered a number of possible ploys but discovered nothing and still don’t know how he might be concealing something __4__ a hundred thousand pounds.”

The members turned to one another and whispered for a few moments. Then the president turned and said. “Colonel, we think you have overlooked a rather obvious possibility: the letters from South America had rare stamps __5__ thousands of pounds each”.

  1. A) founded b) saw c) found d) was

  2. A) a courier b) a career c) a carriage d) a carry-cot

  3. A) of b) off c) by d) into

  4. A) as b) else c) as if d) like

  5. A) worth b) worse c) with the value d) valuable










PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The detective problem of Colonel Montgomery was solved by the clubmen.

  2. The arm of the luckless stranger from South America was broken.

  3. The stranger came to London by boat.

  4. Colonel Montgomery told the clubmen about the number of possible ploys the stranger might have.

  1. The clubmen came to the conclusion that the stranger:

  1. Posted currency to him and used stamps.

  2. Had valuable stamps.

  3. Had an arm fractured in the car accident.

  4. Was sent to hospital и Scotland Yard.

  1. The London Mystery Club members:

  1. Coped with the problem.

  2. Enjoyed discussing the mystery novel.

  3. Were intelligence service men.

  4. Overlooked a rather obvious possibility.

  1. The stranger was:

  1. A financier.

  2. A Nazi agent in Mystery Club.

  3. A South American refugee.

  4. A possessor of a great deal of wealth.

  1. The word espionage means:

  1. Counterfeit.

  2. Deceit.

  3. Practice of spying or using spies.

  4. Speculation.











TEST 5


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. b


Who was the thief?

Mick, the __1__ investigator, was wondering who could steal computer designs. It might have been John Howard. He had recently __2__ the designs for a lot of money. He could have stolen them himself in order to collect the money. So, Mick started to look around the office. First, he noticed that the glass from the broken window was outside the office. So the thief must have broken the window from inside the room. He wanted to make it look someone had broken __3__. Also, the safe hadn’t been forced open, so the thief must have known the combination. A number of the envelopes in the safe had been opened, although only the designs had been stolen. So, there couldn’t have been John Howard or Gerald Wilson because they both knew which envelope the designs were in. And that __4__ only one thing: Mr. Howard’s secretary, Linda Perkins, must have stolen the designs. She had the key to the office and knew the combination, but didn’t know about the exact envelope. It took only a few minutes to get a full __5__ from Linda.

  1. A) privileged b) private c) previous d) proposed

  2. A) assured b) mentioned c) adjusted d) insured

  3. A) in b) to c) away d) out of it

  4. A) proved to b) seemed c) associated d) meant

  5. A) consideration b) confession c) contribution d) cooperation


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Mick had several suspects, but he knew how to find the criminal.

  2. It seemed like the safe was unlocked naturally, no damage had been done.

  3. The criminal didn’t want others to think that he had entered the building by force.

  4. Only a couple of people knew where exactly the designs were.

  1. What was the main task of Mick?

  1. He was sorting out the designs in the envelopes.

  2. He was trying to guess of the glass had been broken.

  3. He wanted to find out who could take the designs.

  4. He had to find office clerks.

  1. Why did Mick decide that John Howard was not to blame?

  1. Because he knew about the designs.

  2. John couldn’t open the safe, so he didn’t succeed.

  3. There was no need for him to open more than one envelope.

  4. Linda told Mick it wasn’t John Howard, but Gerald Wilson.

  1. Which clue did Mick find to catch the real thief?

  1. He asked Linda Perkins about the case.

  2. Some envelopes had been opened.

  3. It was somebody who could invest money into the designs.

  4. The glass was everywhere.

  1. The word design means:

  1. A former sign.

  2. A new, fast computer.

  3. A plan or a sketch.

  4. An expensive envelope.




TEST 6


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. b


The least well-planned robbery.

Three thieves at Billerica in Essex gave hours of __1__ in 1971 to raiding the Post Office in Mountnessing Road.

Among the details which they discovered were the times at which there was __2__ cash and least security guard on the premises. They also invested in mask, guns and a get-away car. At a __3__ time, the Mountnessing gang sped through Billerica and screeched to a halt outside the post office.

It was only __4__ they jumped out of the car and ran towards the building that they discovered the one detail which they had omitted to check. The Post Office had been __5__ for twelve years.

  1. A) thought b) schemes c) ideas d) plots

  2. A) least b) larger c) bigger d) most

  3. A) pre-ordered b) pre-arranged c) post-arranged d) predictable

  4. A) before b) while c) after d) as soon as

  5. A) stolen b) open c) closed d) robbed


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The raid on the Post office was not a success.

  2. The Post Office in Mountnessing Road was to become a profitable investment for masks, guns and a get-away car.

  3. The three thieves could not carry out their raid.

  4. It was the Post Office at Billerica in Essex that the three thieves chose for their raid.

  1. The thieves discovered:

  1. The Post Office in Mountnessing Road to raid.

  2. The times most suitable for the raider.

  3. All the necessary details about the Post Office.

  4. Cash in the Post Office at Billerica in Essex.

  1. What other headline would you give to the story?

  1. The robbery that wasn’t.

  2. Masks, guns and the get-away car that did it!

  3. The thieves who terrorized the Post Office.

  4. Post Office raided.

  1. Why didn’t the thieves succeed?

  1. Their car couldn’t get away from the halt outside the post office.

  2. The only detail the thieves didn’t check proved to be very important.

  3. The gang sped through Billerica and screeched to a halt.

  4. There wasn’t enough security guard in the Post Office.

  1. The word premises means:

  1. Premium, reward, bonus.

  2. Lawn near the Post Office.

  3. House or building with its land, etc.

  4. Land of wealth and promise.


TEST 7


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. b



The worst bank robbers.

In August 1975 three men were on their __1__ in to rob the Royal Bank of Scotland at Roth say, when they got stuck in the revolving doors. They had to be helped free by the staff and, after thanking everyone, sheepishly left the building. A few minutes later they returned and announced their intention of robbing the bank, but __2__ staff believed them. When, at first, they demanded €5000, the head cashier laughed at them, convinced that it was a __3__ joke. Disheartened by this, the gang leader reduced his demand first to €500, then to €50 and ultimately to 50 pence. By this stage the cashier could barely control herself for __4__.

Then one of the men jumped over the counter and fell awkwardly on the floor. The other two made their get-away, but got trapped in the revolving doors for a second time, desperately pushing the __5__ way.

  1. A) road b) plans c) way d) plain

  2. A) no b) none of the c) nobody of d) the

  3. A) practical b) theoretical c) humorous d) real

  4. A) reaction b) check c) money d) laughter

  5. A) right b) left c) straight d) wrong


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The staff had to help the thieves free.

  2. The revolving doors were an obstacle to the unfortunate thieves: they had to revolve sheepishly.

  3. It was in August 1975 that the robbers failed to rob the bank.

  4. It was due to the revolving doors that the robbers could not enter the Royal Bank of Scotland for the first time.

  1. If the staff:

  1. Had not given the thieves €500, they would have stolen the money.

  2. Had not lent the thieves €5000, they would have asked for more money.

  3. Had believed the thieves, they would have treated the three men seriously.

  4. Had not borrowed the money, the gang leader would not have reduced the demand.

  1. What made the gang leader reduce his demand?

  1. He was disheartened by the joke.

  2. He was supposed to demand €5000 first and reduce the demand to €500, then to €50 and then to 50 pence.

  3. The way the gang was treated by the staff.

  4. His generosity.

  1. What other headline could you give to the story?

  1. The blood-curdling story of Royal Bank of Scotland: panic and terror.

  2. The agony and the ecstasy of the Royal Bank of Scotland.

  3. Revolving mysteries of the Royal Scotland.

  4. The robbery that wasn’t.

  1. The word counter means:

  1. Cash machine.

  2. Small flat surface on which customers are served.

  3. Cashier’s machine.

  4. Cashier’s stool.















TEST 8


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. b


The crimes those were easiest to detect.

The __1__ crimes were detected almost immediately after they had been committed.

In 1972 Mr. J. Egan from London stole a __2__ on the river Thames and was very soon caught. There was a dock strike an and his was the only craft moving that day.

Mr. J. Ealey committed a burglary in Detroit in 1968 and left his dog at the scene __3__ the crime. The police soon arrived and shouted “Home, boy!” They then followed the dog back to the __4__ house. And arrived only seconds after he did.

In May 1976 Vernon Drinkwater and Raymond Heap of Blackburn were accused of stealing a car __5__ trying to sell it to its original owner.

  1. A) following b) next c) last d) cruel

  2. A) canal b) barge c) trailer d) truck

  3. A) past b) before c) off d) of

  4. A) detectives b) police c) burglar’s d) criminal

  5. A) in spite of b) instead of c) while d) as soon as



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The police could hardly ever solve the crimes mentioned in the text.

  2. The three crimes hardly presented difficulties for those who detected them.

  3. The dock strike, the dog and the effort to sell the car were important clues for the police.

  4. The crimes had no sooner been committed than they were detected.

  1. Mr. J. Egan from London:

  1. Could not enjoy his prey long.

  2. Committed the crime to be detected.

  3. Was caught at the dock strike.

  4. Was moving on the only craft with the strikers.

  1. Why was Mr. J. Ealey’s crime detected?

  1. There were few burglaries in Detroit in 1968.

  2. Shouts of the police frightened the dog.

  3. His dog came in handy for the police.

  4. There was a dog back at his house.

  1. How did the police manage to detect the crime of Mr. Drinkwater and Mr. Heap?

  1. They had been accused of stealing a car by May 1976.

  2. The original owner of the car was accused of stealing.

  3. The original owner recognized his car when he was offered to buy it.

  4. The owner of the car was original.

  1. The word craft means:

  1. Occupation of trade.

  2. Skill or ability.

  3. A boat or a ship.

  4. An aircraft.


TEST 9


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. b


The __1__ successful mugger.

87-year-old Lady Tucker was walking down New York’s East 66th Street. She looked like an easy prey – small, grey-haired and expensively dressed. Ramos came up on his bicycle and grabbed her handbag. Lady Tucker hit him on the head with her umbrella, knocking him off his bicycle, and started screaming.

The __2__ mugger tried to get back onto his bicycle and escape, but Lady Tucker __3__ hitting him. A lorry driver, hearing her screams, came and joined in the fight. They __4__ fighting, until a policeman arrived and took Ramos prisoner. Lady Tucker __5__ medical help, saying that she felt fine. But she allowed the policeman to escort her home.

  1. A) less b) least c) worse d) bad

  2. A) criminal b) prolific c) romantic d) unfortunate

  3. A) kept b) stayed c) left d) advised

  4. A) were sorry b) started c) went on d) thought of

  5. A) declared b) detested c) insisted of d) refused


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Lady Tucker looked like the previous prey of Ramos – small, grey-haired and expensively dressed.

  2. Lady Tucker proved to be a good fighter.

  3. Lady Tucker was courageous.

  4. Lady Tucker was resourceful.

  1. Why did Ramos decide to mug Lady Tucker?

  1. Because he thought that it won’t be difficult to cope with the task.

  2. He liked small, grey-haired and expensively dressed ladies.

  3. He liked Lady Tucker.

  4. New York’s East 66th Street was the place where he used to mug.

  1. Why didn’t Ramos retreat?

  1. Lady Tucker didn’t want him to leave her at the crucial moment.

  2. He didn’t manage to do it.

  3. He was far from his bicycle.

  4. He couldn’t do it because of the handbag.

  1. Why did Lady Tucker shout?

  1. She wanted to frighten Ramos.

  2. Ramos wanted to hit her.

  3. Lady Tucker didn’t like the mugger.

  4. She hoped to get help.

  1. The word mugger means:

  1. Person who attacks violently and robs.

  2. Person who wins.

  3. Member of police force.

  4. Person who decides in a contest, dispute, etc.


Unit II.

Not only “Ghost stories”


TEST 1


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. b


Seeing a ghost.

The Cromwell Room at Chavenage Manor was known to be visited by ghosts: no one had dared to sleep in it __1__ 30 years. So when Nicholas Farrell, a journalist, agreed to spend one night in the haunted room alone it was the deal he had made __2__ - to escape would be to fail and break the deal.

Nicholas was not alone in the room though, his dog Heathcliff was with him. When soon after midnight he sat in waiting on the old bed the dog slept. Then he saw it, a headless __3__, moving towards him. In a moment someone was on him, pressing the weight, breathing. Something cold and wet bent over the man. He tried to move his head __4__ but could not, being paralyzed.

Nicholas woke up at dawn confronted by the head of Heathcliff sitting on top of him and licking his face. He had survived. All he had __5__ in the Cromwell Room was a troubled dream. But as he left the room, he made the sign of the cross, just in case.

  1. A) alone b) since c) for d) within

  2. A) with himself b) with no one c) with him d) for nothing

  3. A) monument b) Cromwell c) Chavenage d) figure

  4. A) away b) from c) towards d) outside

  5. A) tried b) experimented c) tested d) experienced



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Nicholas Farrell promised himself that he would spend a night in the room.

  2. Ghosts were known to visit the Cromwell Room.

  3. 30 years ago people used to sleep in the Cromwell Room.

  4. The journalist agreed to spend a night and haunt the Cromwell Room.

  1. What was so special about the Cromwell Room?

  1. It was infamous for its ghosts.

  2. There was hardly anyone who missed the chance to sleep in шею

  3. Nicholas Farrell and his dog spent a night there.

  4. Journalists made deals about its ghosts.

  1. Who frightened the journalist?

  1. His own dog.

  2. The ghost who frequented the room.

  3. The lord of Chavenage Manor he had made the deal with.

  4. Cromwell, the owner of the room.

  1. Nicholas Farrell:

  1. Woke up soon after midnight to find something moving towards him.

  2. Was alone in the infamous room, except for his dog Heathcliff.

  3. Made the sign of the cross to be able to leave the room.

  4. Failed to escape the room.

  1. The word deal means:

  1. Argument.

  2. Treaty.

  3. Agreement, bargain.

  4. Project.



TEST 2


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. b


It was the ghost of a man...

It was the ghost of a man who __1__ in the room at the top of the house because he had a terrible illness – he was a leper. Anyway, the people of the town made the man __2__ in the little room. They kept him there and they didn’t let him see his wife or children.

He had to stay there for four years. He got worse, and knocked and knocked and knocked on the door to make somebody hear him. __3__, they let him leave the room. They told him they __4__ him to go home to see his family again. But when he got into the street he didn’t see his family. He saw all the town’s people with stones in their hands. They stoned the poor man __5__ death. No wonder his ghost was so unhappy.

  1. A) locked b) was locked c) locks d) had locked

  2. A) to live b) lives c) lived d) live

  3. A) at last b) last c) in last d) at least

  4. A) will allow b) allow c) would allow d) will be allowed

  5. A) after b) into c) up d) to


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The man was happy to be locked.

  2. The man had to stay in the room.

  3. The man got worse and knocked on the door.

  4. When the man left the room he didn’t see his family.

  1. Why did the man knock on the door?

  1. He didn’t know what to do.

  2. He didn’t like the room.

  3. He got bored.

  4. He wanted people to hear him and let him leave the room.

  1. Why did the people make the man stay in the room?

  1. They didn’t like him.

  2. They punished the man.

  3. The man had a terrible illness.

  4. It was a joke.

  1. How long did the man stay in the room?

  1. For four years.

  2. For a month.

  3. For two weeks.

  4. For a year.

  1. What happened to the leper?

  1. He killed himself.

  2. The people killed him.

  3. He recovered.

  4. He was taken to hospital.

TEST 3


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Mrs. Richards as a ghost...

After her husband __1__ to work, Mrs. Richards sent her children to school and went upstairs to her bedroom. She was __2__ excited to do any housework that morning, for in the evening she was going to a fancy dress party with her husband. She intended to dress up as a ghost and as she had made her costume the night before, she was impatient to __3__ it on. Though the costume consisted only of a sheet, it was very effective. After putting it on, Mrs. Richards went downstairs to find out __4__ the costume would be comfortable to wear.

Suddenly Mrs. Richards heard a knock on the front door. She thought it __5__ be the baker. She asked him to come in, and not wanting to frighten the man, hid in the storeroom. First she heard the front door open. Then there were footsteps in the hall and then... the man entered, and before Mrs. Richards could explain anything, he let out a cry and jumped back several paces.

  1. A) has gone b) gone c) was going d) had gone

  2. A) also b) too c) very d) even

  3. A) switch b) try c) get d) give

  4. A) weather b) whether c) that d) what

  5. A) might b) can c) ought to d) should



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. In the evening Mrs. Richards was going to a party.

  2. Mrs. Richards sent her children to school and went upstairs to decorate her bedroom.

  3. Mrs. Richards could think only about the party that morning.

  4. Mrs. Richards’ husband was going to accompany his wife to the party.

  1. Why did Mrs. Richards decide to put on a sheet in the morning?

  1. The sheet was very effective.

  2. She had nothing else to wear.

  3. She wanted to try on the costume of a ghost for the fancy dress party.

  4. It was fashionable to wear sheets at the time.

  1. Why did Mrs. Richards go downstairs?

  1. It wasn’t comfortable to wear her costume in the bedroom.

  2. She was expecting the baker.

  3. She intended to check if the costume would be comfortable to wear.

  4. She heard a knock on the front door.

  1. How did Mrs. Richards happen to be in the storeroom?

  1. She didn’t want to be taken for a ghost and hid there.

  2. She didn’t like the baker.

  3. She thought that her husband had come home from work.

  4. She always went to the storeroom when the baker came to her house.

  1. What did the amn do t the sight of Mrs. Richards in the storeroom?

  1. He shouted and left the house.

  2. He cried and jumped away from Mrs. Richards.

  3. He let Mrs. Richards cry out and jumped back several paces.

  4. He cried and paced up and down the storeroom.


TEST 4


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Crash-land in a field.

All 129 passengers and crew survived yesterday, when a McDonnell Douglas ВС-9 crash-landed in a field after both engines failed two minutes after the flight from Stockholm had begun. Nearly all those __1__ the airliner, which was bound for Warsaw via Copenhagen, walked from the wreck. Seven were seriously injured, and nine slightly hurt.

The aircraft hit trees before crashing and breaking into three pieces without __2__ fire. The wings were torn off. Airline officials said the pilot, Captain Stefan Rasmussen, had __3__ had one minute to find a place to land.

Captain Rasmussen, 44, who appeared __4__ a news conference wearing a medical collar, said, “ There is perhaps only one flight captain in a million who gets to show what he can do in such a situation. I am satisfied with the results.” He __5__, “I am grateful to my crew and the whole organization which enabled me to succeed”.

  1. A) abroad b) on board of c) broad d) aboard

  2. A) catching b) murdering c) rising d) driving

  3. A) while b) only c) additionally d) occasionally

  4. A) while b) into c) at d) to

  5. A) supposed b) talked c) added d) expressed



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The accident happened because the engines were out of order.

  2. The flight was from Poland to Sweden via Copenhagen.

  3. The plane broke into pieces but no fire followed.

  4. Mr. Rasmussen had not planned to land the aircraft: it was an unexpected landing.

  1. The way out Captain Rasmussen found was:

  1. To tear wings, injure seven passengers and hurt nine passengers.

  2. To hit trees but walk from the wreckage.

  3. To fail the engines and choose the place for landing.

  4. To run risks ad crash-land in a field.

  1. What happened to the passengers and crew of the McDonnell Douglas ВC-9?

  1. All of them were alive although some of them were either injured or hurt.

  2. Everybody was alive – safe and sound.

  3. Sixteen of them died and some of them were injured or hurt including the captain who had to wear a medical collar.

  4. The whole organization enabled them to succeed: nobody suffered.

  1. Captain Rasmussen:

  1. Came to the news conference to wear a medical collar.

  2. Was perhaps the one flight captain in a million who managed to show what he could do in a crucial moment.

  3. Was not pleased with the results: the plane no longer existed.

  4. Got to the conference to be one in a million.

  1. The word wreck means:

  1. Tool made of iron.

  2. Container for goods.

  3. The remains of something badly damaged or ruined.

  4. Harbor.

TEST 5


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


The train not stopping at platform one.

British rail passengers from London to Oxford had __1__ detour via Swinton after a train driver forgot to stop at Didcot.

People getting ready to change for a connection train to Oxford on Saturday evening heard the guard __2__ Didcot on the train intercom, but only saw the station flash __3__.

The 30 Oxford-bound passengers reached journey’s end 45 minutes late, after getting a train back from Swinton to Didcot to catch __4__ local train home. The passengers were offered __5__ explanation or apology for what happened. A British Rail spokesman said that the driver had simply forgotten to stop at Didcot. “It’s an error which is regretted,” he said.

  1. A) a scheduled b) an unscheduled c) proposed d) the long awaited

  2. A) declare b) announce c) claim d) passed to

  3. A) past them b) behind it c) past it d) passed to

  4. A) various b) the other c) differently d) another

  5. A) rudely b) nothing c) no d) any

PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The guard announced Didcot in order to see the station flash.

  2. According to the schedule, the train was stop at Didcot.

  3. In Didcot people had to change train to Oxford.

  4. 30 passengers on the train wanted to go to Oxford.

  1. Did the passengers manage to reach Oxford?

  1. Yes, but they had to catch 3 more trains to get journey’s end.

  2. Yes, but they were behind the schedule having to change trains at Swinton.

  3. No, they couldn’t reach their journey’s end.

  4. Yes, but they had to get a train from Swinton to Didcot and then back to London.

  1. How many times did the British Rail passengers from London to Oxford have to change the train?

  1. Twice.

  2. Once.

  3. Thrice.

  4. Twice or thrice.

  1. Why didn’t the train stop at Didcot?

  1. It was an error of the spokesman – the one “which is regretted”.

  2. The tour was unscheduled.

  3. It happened because the driver was absent-minded.

  4. The train intercom didn’t work.

  1. The word detour means:

  1. Road, street, path.

  2. Specially prepared way between places for the use of vehicles.

  3. Safety from road accident.

  4. Roundabout way.



TEST 6


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


April fools’ joke.

A few years ago __1__ was a very unclear photograph of a man on the front page of The Guardian newspaper. The article said that it was the first picture ever taken and that it was __2__ seventy or more years older than any other photo in the world. Somebody in Japan discovered it hidden in a cave where it had been untouched for over two centuries. Apparently an unknown Japanese scientist had invented a special technique for making photographic negatives before anybody in Europe.

A special exhibition was arranged just for one day for the public to view it in London. The reason for that short viewing was because the negative was so old and __3__ in the light for very long. When people went there, there was nothing to see.

The article had been written __4__ of April, which is April Fools’ Day, the day when people play __5__ their friends.

  1. A) it b) there c) their d) -----

  2. A) at least b) at the least c) at last d) last

  3. A) could be b) could not be c) could d) be

  4. A) in the first b) since the first c) at the first d) on the first

  5. A) in jokes b) jokes on c) with jokes about d) jokes in


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. According to The Guardian, the first photo in the world was taken in Asia.

  2. According to The Guardian, the photo was first discovered and then invented in Japan.

  3. According to The Guardian, an unknown Japanese scientist had invented a special technique for making photographic negatives before anybody in Europe.

  4. According to The Guardian, a special exhibition was arranged just for one day for the public in London.

  1. Why couldn’t the public see the photo in London?

  1. The public couldn’t see the photo because it didn’t exist.

  2. The public couldn’t see the photo because the negative was old and couldn’t be left in the light for very long.

  3. The public couldn’t see the photo because the exhibition lasted only one day.

  4. The police didn’t let the public see the photo in London.

  1. Why was the article about the photo published in The Guardian newspaper on the first day of April?

  1. On this day the first photo in the world was taken.

  2. It’s the traditional day for jokes.

  3. Photo exhibitions are arranged on this day.

  4. On this day people read newspapers.

  1. What photograph was there in the newspaper?

It was the photograph of ____.

  1. The author of the article.

  2. Japanese scientist who invented technique for making photographic negatives.

  3. An unknown man.

  4. The Guardian’s editor.

  1. How old was the photo in The Guardian, according to the article?

  1. Seventeen years old.

  2. Less than seventy years old.

  3. Seventy years old.

  4. Seventy or more years older than any other photo in the world.




TEST 7


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Smuggling trucks.

Sam Lewis was a customs officer. He worked in a small border town. It wasn’t a busy town and there wasn’t much work. The road was usually very quiet and __1__ many travelers. It wasn’t a very interesting job, but Sam liked an easy life. About once __2__, he used to meet an old man. His name was Draper. He always arrived __3__ the border in a big truck. The truck was always empty. Sam searched the truck but never __4__ anything. Once he asked Draper about his job. Draper laughed and said, “I’m a smuggler”.

__5__ year Sam retired and went on holiday to Bermuda where one day in a luxury hotel he met Draper. He asked Draper what he had smuggled. The answer was ... “Trucks!”

  1. A) there wasn’t b) were c) there weren’t d) was

  2. A) in a week b) a week c) in week d) on a week

  3. A) at b) to c) on d) towards

  4. A) founded b) find c) didn’t find d) found

  5. A) latest b) in last c) lastly d) last




PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Draper was a smuggler.

  2. Sam Lewis was a customs officer.

  3. Draper’s truck was empty.

  4. Every morning Draper came to the border in a big truck.

  1. What kind of job did Sam have?

  1. Not interesting but an easy one.

  2. It was a very difficult job.

  3. It was a very demanding job.

  4. It was a job to be proud of.

  1. Why did Sam go to Bermuda?

  1. He wanted to arrest Draper?

  2. He gave up his work and wanted to have a holiday.

  3. He went to work there.

  4. He went to search trucks there.

  1. What was there in the truck?

  1. There were many different things in it.

  2. It was full of goods.

  3. There was nothing there.

  4. Gold was there.

  1. Why could Sam never find anything when he searched the truck?

  1. Sam was a bad customs officer.

  2. Sam didn’t know how to search trucks.

  3. Sam didn’t want to find anything.

  4. There was nothing to find – Draper smuggled trucks.













TEST 8


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Beatrice and the nightingale.

One warm night in 1924, the cellist Beatrice Harrison went out to play her cello in the woods behind her cottage. To her surprise, she heard a bird echoing her playing. The sound was incredibly beautiful, and she knew it could only be a nightingale. The next night and nearly every night after that, the nightingale was there again. Beatrice __1__ believe what was happening: she was playing duets with __2__.

Beatrice persuaded the BBC to set up their microphones in her garden. With the technology of the time, this was __3__. But the sound engineers made careful preparations, and everything was ready.

For a long time it seemed as if the nightingale __4__. Beatrice played for two hours with no reaction. But suddenly, to everybody’s __5__, the wonderful notes began to fill the night... the record of the duet of Beatrice and the Nightingale became one of the most successful records sold in the 1930s.

  1. A) couldn’t hardly b) could easy c) could hardly d) tried hard to

  2. A) so wild bird b) a wild bird c) such a wild bird d) a bird wildly

  3. A) no easy task b) not easy task c) easy task d) an easy task

  4. A) was going to come b) was not going to come c) was not going d) went

  5. A) success b) trial c) fame d) relief



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. What of the following is not true?

  1. Beatrice and the bird played duets after rehearsals one warm May night in 1924.

  2. The bird had a sweet voice.

  3. At first Beatrice didn’t expect the bird to echo her playing.

  4. The record of Beatrice and the nightingale were on sale in the 1930s.

  1. How did Beatrice and the nightingale sing?

  1. Beatrice played at the beginning, and the bird sang at the very end.

  2. The bird repeated what Beatrice played.

  3. The bird was echoed by Beatrice.

  4. Beatrice and the bird sang together.

  1. Why did the BBC decide to set up microphones in the garden of Beatrice?

  1. Beatrice was famous because of the nightingale.

  2. The nightingale used to play for the BBC.

  3. The BBC broadcast with the technology of that time was becoming fashionable.

  4. It was the suggestion of the cellist.

  1. The outside broadcast from the garden was not easy, was it?

  1. Both the bird and the sound engineers did their best – there were no troubles at all.

  2. Time passed, and it seemed that the bird would never sing.

  3. Outside broadcast of the kind were often made at the time.

  4. The audience helped Beatrice and the sound engineers.

  1. The word cello means:

  1. Large violin.

  2. Part of the radio receiving apparatus.

  3. Person who sings.

  4. Kind of piano.



TEST 9


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


What happened while the train was in the tunnel?

In the compartment of a train travelling through the countryside, there were for people – a young girl, an old lady, an army officer and a young cockney. Suddenly the train went into a tunnel: for half a minute __1__ was in complete darkness and in the darkness came the sound of a large kiss __2__ almost immediately by a loud slap.

When the train emerged and it was light again, everybody saw the officer with a bleeding nose and a swollen eye. The old lady thought that the young girl hit the officer __3__ stealing a kiss.

The young girl thought it was strange that the officer kissed the old lady and not her. The poor officer thought that the cockney kissed the girl and the girl hit him. And the cockney laughed silently at the trick he __4__. “I’m a clever chap,” he thought __5__. “I kissed the back of my hand; hit the officer in the face and nobody said a word”.

  1. A) the trolley b) the truck c) the carriage d) the locomotive

  2. A) preceded b) following c) preceding d) followed

  3. A) because b) in spite of c) for d) to

  4. A) had smiled b) was playing c) got d) had played

  5. A) oneself b) to himself c) himself d) to him


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Both the kiss and the slap were in complete darkness.

  2. As soon as the train left the tunnel there was a kiss then a slap.

  3. The kiss was followed by the slap.

  4. The slap followed the kiss.

  1. What actually happened in the tunnel?

  1. The young lady hit the officer because he dared to kiss her.

  2. The officer kissed the old lady and she hit him.

  3. The cockney kissed the girl and the girl hit the officer.

  4. The cockney kissed the back of his hand and hit the officer in the face.

  1. Why did the cockney hit the officer?

  1. He hated officers.

  2. He wanted to kill the officer.

  3. He accidentally hit the officer.

  4. He wanted to play a joke.

  1. How did the four passengers react to what happened in the tunnel?

  1. Everybody except the cockney was at a loss – they didn’t really know what had happened.

  2. Nobody was a scandal as soon as the train emerged out of the tunnel.

  3. There was a scandal as soon as the train emerged out of the tunnel.

  4. Everybody liked the situation.

  1. Who was surprised at the thought that the officer kissed the old lady?

  1. The cockney.

  2. The old lady.

  3. The young lady.

  4. Everybody.



TEST 10


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Happy __1__ for the kidnapped girl.

Mr. and Mrs. Peters were especially happy when they celebrated their daughter Marian’s first birthday at a restaurant at the Strand yesterday. Marian was kidnapped last July by Alice McBurg, 31, who had been __2__ to take care of her as a child-minder. Mrs. Peters had left Marian with McBurg on the first day of her return to work at a bank in London. Marian was taken to McBurg’s home in Wales, __3__ police found her, unharmed, three days later.

Mrs. Peters said yesterday, “At the __4__ times in those three days it seemed we would never see her again.” She also said she had no thought now of going back to work. She just couldn’t leave Marian with anybody else. She loved looking __5__ her.

  1. A) review b) Renaissance c) returns d) recall

  2. A) given b) paid c) tried d) stolen

  3. A) where b) as soon as c) until d) consequently

  4. A) first b) worst c) happiest d) tragedy

  5. A) for b) on c) of d) after


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. A one-year old Marian Peters was a loveable daughter.

  2. The restaurant at the Strand saw the special occasion in the Peters’ family.

  3. Marian Peters was kidnapped by the baby-sitter.

  4. As soon as the happy Peters celebrated the birthday of their one-year old daughter, she was kidnapped by Alice McBurg.

  1. It was due to:

  1. The police that Marian was returned to her parents.

  2. Mrs. McBurg that Marian celebrated her first birthday.

  3. The London bankers that the Peters were especially happy.

  4. The care of the child-minder that Marian was safe and sound.

  1. How did Mrs. McBurg happen to be in the Peters’ house?

  1. She was paid by police.

  2. Marian had to be taken care of when her mother was at work.

  3. The Peters hired her to kidnap their daughter.

  4. Mrs. Peters preferred leaving Marian and working at a bank to taking care of her own daughters.

  1. How did the Peters feel about having their daughter back at home again?

  1. They had no thought of doing without another child-minder.

  2. They seemed not to see Marian again.

  3. They were happy and looked like they were on cloud nine.

  4. They couldn’t do without work no matter how they loved being with Marian.

  1. The word unharmed means:

  1. Injured.

  2. Safe.

  3. Wounded.

  4. Endangered.



TEST 11


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Casablanca, the best loved of all motion pictures.

This is the summary of the film Casablanca, probably the best-loved of all motion pictures.

In 1941 Casablanca was the last stage for refugees hoping to escape from the Nazis via Lisbon to the United States, which had not yet __1__ World War II. Rick, an American adventurer, ran __2__ and claimed to be neutral. In Paris, before the Nazi occupation, he was in love with Ilsa, the widow (as she thought) of a resistance leader, but she left him (as she thought) when they were going to escape. __3__, she received hews that her husband was alive and reappeared with him in Casablanca. Rick, who was __4__ in love with Ilsa, helped her and her husband to go to the United States, which required the help of the corrupt prefect of police. In the final scene at the airport, Rick shot Major Strass, who came to prevent Ilsa and her husband from __5__ the plane. They left and the perfect of the police changed sides and went to the headquarters of the Free French with Rick, who decided to take part in the war.

  1. A) taken b) joined to c) entered d) fought

  2. A) a cafe b) the war c) the battle d) a trick

  3. A) finally b) as a fact c) in final d) in fact

  4. A) until b) still c) yet d) last

  5. A) flying b) catching c) enjoying d) throwing


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Casablanca was probably the best-loved picture that made motions.

  2. The text gives to political the main points of the plot in brief.

  3. At the beginning of the film Rick was indifferent events of the time.

  4. Casablanca is the name of both the film and the place, which was the last step for people, forced to flee from danger.

  1. Rick was an American:

  1. Runner.

  2. Manager.

  3. Nazi.

  4. Resistance leader.

  1. Why did Ilsa leave Rick?

  1. Rick claimed to be neutral.

  2. She fell in love story with her husband.

  3. It happened in Paris before the Nazi occupation, and Rick wasn’t a resistance leader.

  4. Ilsa turned out not to be a widow, she learnt that her husband was alive.

  1. In the very last episode of the film:

  1. Major Strass, who prevented Ilsa and her husband from leaving Casablanca, was shot.

  2. Rick, who used to be neutral, made up his mind to take part in the war.

  3. Refugees escaped from the Nazis via Casablanca to the United States.

  4. The perfect of the police became corrupt and joined the Free French.

  1. The word via means:

  1. Backwards.

  2. Instead of.

  3. By way of, through

  4. Towards.


TEST 12


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Sir Ernest Shackleton, the Antarctic Explorer.

The Antarctic explorer, Sir Ernest Shackleton, lost his ship in the ice in 1915, but led his men to __1__ on Elephant Island. Then he decided to try to reach South Georgia, 800 miles away, in a small boat. He __2__ on the uninhabited south-west coast of the island, and with two companions crossed the mountains to the whaling station of Stromness.

When they set off __3__ the whaling station, not more than a mile and a half distant, they were shivering with cold, yet with their hearts light and happy. Their beards were long, they were unwashed and the garments __4__ they had worn for nearly a year without a change were tattered and stained. More unpleasant-looking ruffians could hardly be imagined. But the difficulties of the journey lay behind them. The 22 men left on Elephant Island were __5__ eventually rescued.

  1. A) luxury b) poverty c) treasure d) safety

  2. A) reached b) landed c) arrived d) swam

  3. A) towards b) back c) in the direction d) backwards

  4. A) what b) whole c) that d) while

  5. A) partially b) wholly c) all d) almost


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Sir Ernest Shackleton was a fearless traveler.

  2. The ship of Sir Ernest Shackleton was destroyed by ice.

  3. The south-west coast of the island 800 miles away from South Georgia was packed with people.

  4. Wreck of the ship was the course of tragedy of Sir Shackleton and his men 83 years ago.

  1. Sir Ernest Shackleton lost his ship:

  1. But saved his men.

  2. Since he couldn’t see it well in the thick ice of 1915.

  3. And failed to reach South Georgia.

  1. Mr. Shackleton’s men were on Elephant Island:

  1. To catch elephants and eat them to survive.

  2. To look for whales at the whaling station of Stromness.

  3. Because they were protected from danger there.

  4. Because more unpleasant-looking people could hardly be imagined.

  1. How many people were the first to cross the mountains to the whaling station of Stromness?

  1. 22 b) 22 c) 1,915 d) 3

  1. The word ruffian means:

  1. A scientist.

  2. A gangster, a hooligan.

  3. An exploiter.

  4. A rescuer.


TEST 13


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


The best stone in the world.

In 1796 George and Eleanor Coade bought a factory manufacturing __1__ stone in south-east London. When soon after it George Coade died, he left his wife and daughter to carry on business.

The product developed by the factory’s former owner, Richard Holt, was a kind of baked clay. The two women __2__ with his recipe, and succeeded in creating a new kind of stone which was almost a hundred percent weather-proof. The advantage а Coade Stone __3__ natural stone slowly breaks down and erodes away, Coade Stone seems to be able to survive in all weather conditions for many years.

After the deaths of Eleanor Coade and her daughter the factory __4__ for twenty years, but in 1840 it finally closed. __5__ went the Coade Stone recipe which was lost, and has never been rediscovered.

  1. A) natural b) abnormal c) artificial d) supernatural

  2. A) experimented b) made c) discovered d) completed

  3. A) still b) just c) as d) while

  4. A) opened b) survived c) reduced d) appeared

  5. A) with it b) alone c) but d) along


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. As far back as 229 years ago stone was manufactured in London.

  2. Richard Holt owned a factory, baked clay and completed with the Coades.

  3. The Coades developed business begun by Richard Holt

  4. The product developed by Richard Holt was not exactly the same as the Coades’ one.

  1. Richard Holt’s recipe:

  1. Was left by the manufacture.

  2. Was a kind of baked clay.

  3. Developed the factory’s owner.

  4. Was improved by the Coades.

  1. What was the advantage of the Coade Stone?

  1. It continued to exist in all kinds of weather for a long time.

  2. It was absolutely weather-proof.

  3. It was a natural stone.

  4. Weather proved to have almost a hundred percent influence on it.

  1. What happened with the Coades’ factory after the death of its owners?

  1. Someone else ran it for twenty years.

  2. Finally lack of recipe made it close.

  3. It was lost and never rediscovered.

  4. It continued to work since 1840.

  1. The word recipe means:

  1. Something kept from the knowledge or view of others.

  2. Command given with authority.

  3. Direction for preparing or getting something.

  4. A piece of advice.


TEST 14


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


The __1__ musical trio.

This happened about thirty years ago when George Enesco, the celebrated violinist, agreed to give lessons to the son of a Romanian gentleman though he didn’t have musical talent.

Three years later the boy’s father insisted that the boy gave a public concert. Although Enesco feared the consequences, he arranged a recital in Paris. However, nobody bought a ticket since the soloist was unknown. “Then you must __2__ him on the piano,” said the boy’s father, “and it will be a __3__”. Enesco agreed reluctantly but before the concert he became nervous and __4__ someone to turn the pages. In the audience was Alfred Cortot, the brilliant pianist, who __5__ and made his way to the stage.

Next morning the music critic of Le Figaro wrote about the recital: “The man whom we adore when he lays the violin played the piano. Another whom we adore when he plays the piano turned the pages. But the one, who should have turned the pages, played the violin”.

  1. A) worse b) better c) worst d) best

  2. A) follow b) keep company c) play with d) accompany

  3. A) successful b) sellout c) pleasure d) fancy

  4. A) asked for b) asked about c) was asked for d) ordered

  5. A) raised b) stood c) trembled d) volunteered


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The story happened thirty years ago when George Enesco had a celebration.

  2. George Enesco’s pupil couldn’t boast of musical talent.

  3. George Enesco was asked to give lessons to the son of a Romanian gentleman with no musical talent.

  4. It was due to George Enesco that the recital was made possible.

  1. How did George Enesco happen to play the piano at the recital?

  1. He used every chance to take part in recitals.

  2. Otherwise, he wouldn’t be able to arrange the recital in Paris.

  3. He feared the consequences.

  1. Why did Alfred Cortot turn the pages at the recital in Paris?

  1. The famous violinist did it for a change.

  2. He happened to be in the audience and decided to help George Enesco.

  3. Someone had to do it.

  4. The famous pianist became nervous before the concert.

  1. Did the music critic of Le Figaro like the recital?

  1. Yes, he did. He adored everyone there.

  2. He adored the well-known musicians, but not the role they played at the recital.

  3. He thought that George Enesco’s pupil should give up playing the violin anв start turning the pages.

  4. He hated trios and preferred duets.

  1. The word recital means:

  1. Appointment for musicians.

  2. Performance of music.

  3. Sudden or unexpected meeting.

  4. Arrangement.


TEST 15


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B




The __1__ successful car.

Ford produced the car of the decade in 1957 – the Edsel. Half of the models sold __2__ spectacularly defective. If lucky, you could have got a car with any or all of the following __3__: doors that wouldn’t close, bonnets and boots that wouldn’t open, batteries that went flat, brakes that failed and pushed buttons that couldn’t be pushed even with three of you trying.

The Edsel, one of the biggest and most lavish cars ever built, coincided with a phase when people increasingly wanted economy cars. __4__ Times magazine said, “It was a classic case of the wrong car for the wrong market at the wrong time.” Unpopular from the very beginning, the car’s popularity declined. One business writer at the time __5__ the Edsel’s sales graph to an extremely dangerous ski slope. He added that, so far as he knew, there was only one case of an Edsel ever being stolen.

  1. A) last b) least c) best d) bad

  2. A) turned b) drove c) ran d) proved

  3. A) features b) creatures c) models d) codes

  4. A) after b) or c) as d) since then

  5. A) likened b) liked c) disliked d) graphed


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The Edsel’s deficiencies were numerous.

  2. Not more than three people were able to push buttons of Ford’s cars.

  3. Doors of Edsel cars could hardly if ever close.

  4. The Edsel wasn’t a success.

  1. In 1957:

  1. People wanted an economy car and they got шею

  2. Bonnets and boots of cars wouldn’t open.

  3. The Edsel sold out.

  4. Ford didn’t produce a car satisfying the needs of the market.

  1. Why wasn’t the Edsel popular?

  1. There were no other big and lavish cars to be compared to.

  2. Only lucky people could get the car.

  3. The popularity declined before the car appeared.

  4. Both the car and the market for it were improper.

  1. The ski slope:

  1. Was described by the business writer.

  2. Was the only place where the Edsel could be driven.

  3. Contributed to the unpopularity of the Edsel.

  4. Was compared with the Edsel’s sales graph.

  1. The word lavish means:

  1. Marked by or produced with extravagance or profusion.

  2. Greedy.

  3. Economic.

  4. Large.









































Unit III.

Just so stories.


TEST 1


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


The four-minute mile.

It is the nature of athletic records that they are broken and their place is taken by others. __1__ in many sports events, there is a mark which is not significant in itself, but which becomes a legend as athletes try to break it. The most famous of these is the attempt to run the mile __2__ four minutes.

In 1945, the mile record was brought down to 4 minutes, 1.5 seconds. And there, for nine years, it stuck. Then, in 1954, a medical student Roger Bannister decided to try and __3__ the record. He had been training for this day __4__ running the mile in 4 minutes, 2 seconds the previous year.

He wrote afterwards: “Those last few seconds seemed never-ending. I could see the line of the finishing tape. I jumped like a man making a desperate attempt to say himself from danger...”

Bannister’s time was 3 minutes, 59.4 seconds. Although this record has been broken on many occasions since, Banister’s __5__ will never been forgotten.

  1. A) and b) though c) although d) yet

  2. A) as short as b) in less than c) less as d) for more than

  3. A) set b) run c) break d) hit

  4. A) since b) for c) in spite d) as soon as

  5. A) achievement b) failure c) advantage d) experiment

PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. It is the nature of athletic records that they might be broken and then set by other athletes.

  2. To set four-minute record for the mile proved to be a difficult task.

  3. Roger Bannister studied medicine and trained for contests.

  4. The story of the medical student who brought down the world record has become a legend.

  1. What was so important about Roger Bannister’s achievement?

  1. He managed to save himself from danger.

  2. The way he tried and did it no matter how difficult it was.

  3. He was able to see the line of the finishing tape.

  4. Afterwards he wrote about his record.

  1. How long did it take Roger Bannister to improve his result from 4 minutes, 2 seconds to the record time?

  1. 9 years.

  2. 2.6 seconds.

  3. A year.

  4. 3 minutes, 59.4 seconds.

  1. Has anybody run the mile in a shorter period of time than 3 minutes, 59.4 seconds?

  1. Nobody: Bannister’s record will never been forgotten.

  2. People didn’t dare to do it: it was a mark in itself.

  3. Many people have done шею

  4. A few legendary athletes have done it.

  1. The verb to stick (stuck) means:

  1. To remain unchanged, in the same position, at the same positin.

  2. To change dramatically.

  3. To move fast.

  4. To leave behind.


TEST 2


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B





From the history of tennis.

Four thousand years ago, an Egyptian sculptor carved a picture on a wall а two women hitting a ball back and forth from hand __1__ hand. Is this the ancestor of tennis?

Tennis was __2__ to Norway from Greece in 500 A.D. it became so popular between the twelfth and fourteenth century that every town in France had own __3__. But this was a very different game from the one we see at Wimbledon today. At first the game was played bare-handed with a leather ball filled with dog’s hair. __4__ rougher materials like sand and chalk were used but these caused injures to the players’ hands. This led to the use of protective gloves __5__ got bigger and bigger as time went on until it was necessary to cut out the centuries and replace them with tight ropes. Gradually these gloves evolved into rackets.

  1. A) in b) under c) out d) to

  2. A) sent b) caught c) known d) brought

  3. A) center b) hall c) courtroom d) court

  4. A) later b) late c) lately d) latter

  5. A) it b) which c) this d) what


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The picture of two women on the wall could show the game from which tennis originated.

  2. As far as four thousand years ago Egyptian sculptor could make carvings on walls.

  3. Sculptors of two Egyptian women could be the prototype of modern tennis.

  4. Tennis was one of the popular forms of entertainment in France between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries.

  1. When did tennis become known in Europe?

  1. 500 years ago.

  2. 1,500 years ago

  3. 4,000 years ago

  4. Between the 12th and 14th centuries.

  1. To what country do tennis players of Northern Europe owe the game?

  1. Egypt b) Greece c) France d) Europe

  1. Why did tennis players have to wear gloves?

  1. To make hand bigger and bigger.

  2. To cut out centers.

  3. To replace gloves with ropes.

  4. To protect hands from injuries.

  1. The word injury means:

  1. An accident.

  2. A place in the body that is hurt or wounded.

  3. Warriors.

  4. Support.


TEST 3


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


From the history of golf.

No __1__ really knows where the game of golf was first played. __2__ played a game with wooden sticks and a leather ball filled with features, but the details are not __3__.

In the 15th century, golf first appeared in the written history of Scotland. In 1457 the Scottish parliament was displeased with the number of people playing golf instead of training for the army and the game was banned. __4__, by 1503 even the King had started playing golf again.

Mary, the Queen of Scots, is thought to have been the first woman - __5__. People say she played a few rounds of golf just after her husband was murdered.


  1. A) body b) some c) thing d) one

  2. A) Rome b) The Romans c) Roman d) The Roman

  3. A) known b) covered c) opened d) solved

  4. A) So b) Hence c) That’s why d) However

  5. A) golf b) game c) golfer d) play


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. It is due to the written history of Scotland that we know the history of golf in detail.

  2. The game of golf people of Rome played some centuries ago was quite different from the one we see today.

  3. Wooden sticks and leather balls filled with features have been replaced by golf-clubs and hard balls when playing golf now.

  4. 543 years ago there appeared a threat that golf would never be played again.

  1. Who knows where exactly the game of golf originated?

  1. Nobody.

  2. People of Rome.

  3. The King of Scotland.

  4. Mary, the Queen of Scots.

  1. Why was the Scottish parliament displeased with the number of people playing golf?

  1. Members of the Scottish parliament were not allowed to play golf.

  2. Playing golf contradicted Scottish traditions.

  3. People who played golf outnumbered those who trained the army.

  4. Many people preferred to play golf rather than train for the army.

  1. What was the attitude of the Scottish Royal Family of the time to playing golf?

  1. His Majesty the King played golf over and over again.

  2. Even Mary, the Queen of Scots, thought of playing golf.

  3. Members of the Royal Family banned the game.

  4. There are some reasons to believe that Mary, the Queen of Scotland, played golf even after the tragic event in her family.

  1. The verb to ban means:

  1. To give permission.

  2. To control.

  3. An order that a thing must not be done.

  4. To continue.




TEST 4


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


From the history of football.

Football is a very old sport, but it was no laughing matter in the early days. Two villages __1__ to kick a ball made from a pig’s intestine to a goal. The goals were thing like trees or buildings and could be __2__ five miles apart. The game, which was sometimes extremely violent, could __3__ from sunrise to sunset. A more controlled form of the game began to be played in England’s public schools in the early 19th century. Each school played a different __4__ of the game and the rules varied widely.

In 1863 a Football Association was established and the members met to decide on the rules. It took five meetings before they could all __5__.

  1. A) Laughed b) battled c) mattered d) had

  2. A) like b) as much c) much as d) as much as

  3. A) go on b) make for c) do with d) give up

  4. A) version b) fashion c) copy d) issue

  5. A) meet b) disagree c) argue d) agree


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Football of the early days was a different game from the one people play now.

  2. Football was known in England as far back as in the beginning of the 19th century.

  3. In the early days of football villages competed to win a game.

  4. Nobody was allowed to laugh at football matches in the early days of the game: it was no laughing matter.

  1. It can be concluded from the text that in the early 19th century football was played in England:

  1. In public to have publicity.

  2. In private schools.

  3. And controlled by schools.

  4. Over more and more control.

  1. How was football played before 1863?

  1. There were no fixed rules universally recognized.

  2. There were no rules to follow.

  3. It was controlled strictly.

  4. It was wide and varied.

  1. When the rules of football were first officially fixed?

  1. 137 years ago.

  2. About two centuries ago.

  3. For 2 centuries.

  4. At the dawn civilization.

  1. The word violent means:

  1. Powerful.

  2. Starving, suffering from hunger.

  3. Using, showing, accompanied by force.

  4. Looking forward to doing something.



TEST 5


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


From the history of windsurfing.

From the deep blue waters of Waikiki Beach __1__ the cold grey Atlantic of Cornwall, surfers have a strange bond with the sea. They are part of a tradition that goes back to the people of Pacific islands, __2__ prayed to the gods for the best waves. From the beginning of the 16th century Hawaiian legends and songs __3__ surfing as an obsession making surfers forget everything, including work and family.

In 1911 America __4__ surfing. The journalist and novelist Jack London wrote about surfing in his book “The shark Hunt”. Soon the craze swept through California and beyond, and surfing has never looked back. Generations of surfers, now think of Hawaii __5__ the Mecca for their sport.

  1. A)till b) under c) to d) in front

  2. A) that b) what c) whom d) who

  3. A) sing b) describe c) listen to d) tell

  4. A) opened b) invented c) discovered d) made

  5. A) like b) as c) so d) than


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Surfers can’t do without the sea waves.

  2. Surfers pray to the gods for the best waves and go back to the Pacific islands.

  3. Surfing – sport in which one balances oneself on a long narrow board while being carried along by heavy waves.

  4. Surfers are known to have connections with the sea.

  1. One may conclude from the text that:

  1. Hawaiian folklore treated surfing as a fixed idea that occupied the mind of people.

  2. Surfing originated from the gods of waves.

  3. Deep waters of Waikiki were the best place for surfing.

  4. Surfers of Cornwall were followers of their traditions.

  1. The year 1911 is mentioned in the text mainly to indicate that:

  1. Surfing became known and popular in America.

  2. Jack London wrote the book “The Shark Hunt”.

  3. Shark hunting became fashionable due to the book by J. London.

  4. American dream of the new kind of sport came true.

  1. In California:

  1. No surfers appeared.

  2. People have been enthusiastic about surfing since the beginning of the 20th century.

  3. Surfing was never known.

  4. Surfing was never looked фею

  1. The word craze means:

  1. The Mecca for surfing.

  2. Enthusiastic interest that may last for some time.

  3. Boards of surfing.

  4. To look back.



TEST 6


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


The eight o’clock news (1).

Good evening and here is the eight o’clock news.

Jumbo, theу Indian elephant which __1__ from London zoo this afternoon, has been caught. Jumbo was chased across Regent’s Park, and was finally captured at __2__ stall in regent’s Park Road. A tranquillizer gun was used, and Jumbo was loaded onto __3__ and was taken back to the zoo.

At the zoo, he __4__ the zoo veterinary surgeon. Fortunately __5__ had been done, and Jumbo will be returned to the elephant house later tonight. Viewers will be able to see the highlights of the chase after the news. And lastly, sport...

  1. A) hid b) stole c) escaped d) robbed

  2. A) a hot dog b) the dog c) the warm dog d) the wild cat

  3. A) a tram-car b) the zoo c) the shop d) a truck

  4. A) examined b) shot c) was questioned by d) was examined by

  5. A) soon damage b) no damage c) damages d) lots of damage



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The new about the Jumbo was the last but one in the Eight o’clock news of the day.

  2. Luckily Jumbo was safe and sound after the chase.

  3. The Eight o’clock news with the news about Jumbo could be heard on the radio on the day of the chase.

  4. Jumbo was an Indian elephant.

  1. Why did the chasers have to use the gun?

  1. They did it to make Jumbo calm.

  2. They wanted to shoot the elephant.

  3. The veterinary surgeon needed the gun to frighten Jumbo.

  4. Guns are always used when elephants are chased.

  1. Why wa the surgeon necessary?

  1. To make sure there was nothing wrong with Jumbo.

  2. The chasers could not cope with their task without him.

  3. Jumbo needed an operation.

  4. Jumbo wouldn’t go to the elephant house without the surgeon.

  1. Did they promise to show the chase?

  1. Yes, they promised to show everything.

  2. Yes, but only the fragments of it.

  3. Yes, but probably it could hardly be seen because the lights were high.

  4. Yes, but the chase could be easily lost in the high lights.

  1. The word stall means:

  1. A compartment for one animal.

  2. A small, open shop used by a trader on a street, in a park, etc.

  3. Seats in the part of a theatre nearest to stage.

  4. A car park.



TEST 7


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


The eight o’clock news (2).

Good evening and here is the eight o’clock news.

Five thousand people marched through the streets of Chesilworth today protesting __1__ plans for a new international airport near the town. Although there was such a large number of demonstrators, there __2__.

The demonstrators marched to the town hall, where the public enquiry into the plans __3__, and handed in a petition to the chairman of the enquiry. A new airport is needed because the other airports in the area are __4__. Chesilworth was considered because it is near both a major motorway and a railway line. Although it was a protest march, there was almost a carnival atmosphere, and both demonstrators and police remained __5__.

  1. A) for b) about c) against d) due to

  2. A) was no trouble c) wasn’t a trouble

  1. Were troubles d) was trouble

  1. A) had taken place b) was on the place

  1. took many places d) was taking place

  1. a) under the crowds b) below the crowds c) overcrowded

  1. without crowds

  1. a) without humor b) good-humored c) isolated d) depressed



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The new airport had to be built because the other ones in the neighborhood were too busy.

  2. Chesilworth was the proper place for the new airport because of its location.

  3. The plans for a new airport were not approved by the demonstrators.

  4. The demonstrators didn’t like the idea of having carnivals at the airport, hence the protest march.

  1. What was the destination of the demonstrators?

  1. The major motorway.

  2. Both the motorway and the railway line.

  3. The town hall.

  4. The railway line.

  1. What was the chairman of the enquiry given?

  1. An invitation to the carnival.

  2. A talisman.

  3. A written document.

  4. A schedule of the town hall meetings.

  1. What were the demonstrators like?

  1. They were peaceful.

  2. They were noisy and troublesome.

  3. They were aggressive.

  4. They were inclined to fight.

  1. The word enquiry means:

  1. Trouble.

  2. Investigation.

  3. Celebration.

  4. Isolation.



TEST 8


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


The eight o’clock news (3).

Good evening and here is the eight o’clock news.

Air-sea rescue helicopters from Royal Air Force Sopworth were called out after a yacht capsized in a storm __1__ the Devon coast. In spite of high seas the helicopters __2__ rescue teams to try and save the crew. Two men and a girl were taken to __3__. One was lost at sea. The other was rescued and taken to hospital but was dead on arrival. The coast-guard __4__ small boats to stay in the harbor, but the yacht, the “Napoleon III” from Poole, had set out for France __5__ the warnings.

Viewers will be able to see the members of the rescue teams after the news.

  1. A) near from b) off c) away d) of

  2. A) rose b) jumped c) ran d) lowered

  3. A) safety b) campaign c) session d) competition

  4. A) would say b) promised c) had asked d) helped

  5. A) because of b) due to c) since d) despite



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The Eight o’clock news could be heard on the radio.

  2. The news tells about a yacht capsized in a storm.

  3. In spite of high seas the helicopters managed to try and help the crew.

  4. The eight o’clock news could be heard and seen on TV.

  1. How many members of the crew were there on the yacht?

  1. 5.

  2. 4.

  3. More than 5.

  4. 2 men and a girl.

  1. Could the members of the crew know about the approaching storm?

  1. Yes. The high seas showed it.

  2. Yes. The helicopters came because of the storm.

  3. No. no one had told them about it.

  4. Yes. The coast-guard had warned them.

  1. Where did the yacht go?

  1. To the city of Napoleon.

  2. To France.

  3. To Devon.

  4. To Sopworth.

  1. The verb to capsize means:

  1. To start.

  2. To keep.

  3. To overturn.

  4. To leave.







TEST 9


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Breaking news.

At 8 p. m., October 330th, 1938, millions of Americans listened in to the start of the Charlie McCarthy Show on their radios. It was a popular show and had a large __1__ across the U.S. That night, however, the show had a new singer. He was __2__. After he had started singing, many listeners became bored and tuned in to a __3__, CBS, to see if there was anything better on there. First, they heard some Latin American dance music performed by Ramon Raquello’s orchestra. Then the announcer __4__, “Ladies and gentlemen, we interrupt our programme to bring you a special bulletin from the intercontinental radio news. A number of explosions of gas had been observed on Mars. And, moreover, there are reports of a “jet of blue flame” moving away from Mars towards the Earth at great speed”. The music returned.

Later, the announcer added, “A huge flaming object, believed to be a meteorite, __5__ a farm in New Jersey. Our reporter will give you a description of the scene soon”.

  1. A) representation b) audience c) publication d) number

  2. A) a nova b) novice c) an unknown one d) a stranger

  3. A) rival station b) enemy station c) various station d) varied station

  4. A) broke through b) brought in c) scratched d) broke in

  5. A) bombed on b) fell on c) ascended on d) targeted on



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. If a radio programme was not interesting, people could tune in to another one.

  2. The announcer interrupted some dance music which was very boring.

  3. A large cosmic object landed in America.

  4. The text is about the way once the news was made known or, in other words, how theу news was broken.

  1. Why did many Americans listen to the Charlie McCartney Show?

  1. There was good Latin music on there.

  2. They could listen to the intercontinental news.

  3. New and fresh singers had to start there.

  4. It was pretty famous in America.

  1. What kind of programme were people listening to when the news came in?

  1. Male singing.

  2. News bulletins.

  3. Orchestral music.

  4. The Charlie McCartney Show.

  1. When did a meteorite land in New Jersey?

  1. When the announcer was breaking the news with a description of the scene.

  2. When the music was overdone.

  3. On an autumn evening.

  4. When CBS started broadcasting.

  1. The word jet means:

  1. A meteorite.

  2. A Martian gas.

  3. A stream of burning substance.

  4. An object.





TEST 10


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


The story with no heading.

The programme started on the night of Sunday, October 30, 1938 undramatically enough. At 8 p. m. __1__ heard, “ The Columbia Broadcasting System presents Orson Welles and his Mercury Theatre of the Air in War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells”. Then came the unmistakable voice of Orson Welle. He was interrupted by a news announcer reading a __2__ bulletin, “Tonight’s weather...” Nothing to cause alarm at this stage.

A few minutes after 8 o’clock a sombre voice interrupted the radio broadcast to warn Americans, “Ladies and gentlemen, I have a grave announcement to make...” The words that followed beamed out in a programme networked across the USA, __3__ remarkable scenes of panic. __4__ the announcement was that Martians had landed in North America and were moving across the country at great speed. The USA was being taken over by men from outer space, all resistance was useless.

The announcement was part of the radio play, but __5__ so realistic and produced by such a genius of the theatre that most people who heard it took it for the fact. Besides, people who had tuned in from the start were already beginning to forget that what they were listening to was really a radio play.

  1. A) listeners b) audience c) spectators d) radio viewers

  2. A) weathering b) startling c) routine d) discouraging

  3. A) followed b) caused c) announced d) alarmed

  4. A) so b) as if c) however d) for

  5. A) one b) this c) that d) radio



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. There was nothing peculiar about the radio programme at 8 o’clock on October 30, 1938.

  2. The Columbia broadcasting net worked across the USA.

  3. The unmistakable Orson Welles and his actor announced the bulletin of Martians provoking panic in North America.

  4. The genius of Orson Welles made most people forget it was only the radio play they were listening to.

  1. The sombre voice interrupting the radio broadcast after 8 o’clock:

  1. Could be heard throughout the United States.

  2. Belonged to Martians.

  3. Was too grave to announce the news.

  4. Was panic stricken by Martians landing in North America.

  1. What were Americans warned against?

  1. War of the world.

  2. The impending invasion.

  3. News announcements.

  4. Realistic and disastrous genius of the theatre.

  1. What heading would you give to the story?

  1. The weekend in America.

  2. Martians in panic.

  3. Bulletins of Orson Welles.

  4. The Martians have landed.

  1. The word resistance means:

  1. Opposition.

  2. Invasion.

  3. Contradiction.

  4. Promotion.


TEST 11


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B





Bernie, a St. Bernard dog.

Bernie, a loveable two-year old St. Bernard dog, had become excited during a walk with his owner, Michael Harriman, 58, and __1__ down Mrs. Rae Whyte near her home in Hempland Avenue, York, in February. The dog seized Mrs. Whyte’s arm and forced her to the ground. She suffered a wound on her arm, which required several stitches, as well as suffering from __2__.

Mr. Harriman told the police that Bernie, who was on a lead, was an inquisitive dog and when Mrs. Whyte had raised her arm he had thought it was a __3__ to play.

The case was brought to York Magistrate Court but the dog narrowly escaped the serious prosecution. Nick Darwin, defending, said, “It was an accident. Bernie had never shown ant aggression. Several neighbors have confirmed it. It isn’t __4__ a St. Bernard’s nature to bite people and the breed is renowned for saving human lives”.

Mr. Harriman agreed to keep the dog __5__ and was ordered to pay the costs of the hearing of the case in court. Mrs. Whyte was paid damages.

  1. A) met b) brought c) bit d) knocked

  2. A) apathy b) shock c) lethargy d) excitement

  3. A) signal b) start c) tape d) beginning

  4. A) in favor b) against c) over d) in

  5. A) over lead b) uncontrolled c) under control d) under arrest




PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Bernie was a renowned biter.

  2. Bernie, two-year old, was a pet.

  3. Excitement caused the dog to hurt Mrs. Whyte.

  4. Mrs. Rae Whyte was an inhabitant of York.

  1. The owner of the dog:

  1. Suffered from the inquisitive dog.

  2. Had to excite Bernie during the walk.

  3. Was too old to keep the dog on a lead.

  4. Explained the reason of the accident to the police.

  1. Why did Mrs. Rae Whyte raise her hand?

  1. To tease the dogs.

  2. She did it accidentally.

  3. To suffer injuries.

  4. She was forced to the ground.

  1. What is St. Bernard’s breed famous for?

  1. For the name of the saint who patronize dogs.

  2. It’s natural for them to be inquisitive.

  3. For rescuing people.

  4. For being friendly with neighbors: several neighbors have confirmed it.

  1. The word damages means:

  1. Money to be paid as compensation for injury or loss.

  2. Stipend to a judge.

  3. Money paid for hearing of the case in court.

  4. Stipend from a judge.





TEST 12


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Polly at the arrivals halls.

It was only yesterday evening when Polly collected her luggage, went through customs and out into the Arrivals Hall. To her surprise a crowd of people with cameras and notebooks __1__ her, and began taking pictures of her and shouting out questions: “Did you have a good flight?”, “Is this your first trip to England?”, __2__. They were all staring at her intently.

Before __3__, one of them suddenly pointed to someone behind her and shouted: “That’s her!” Polly turned __4__ a well-known film star who had been on the same flight with her. Oh, well, it was nice to think that she __5__ for someone so beautiful and so famous, even if it was only for a few moments.

  1. A) rushed towards b) were rushing towards c) rushed behind d) rushed in

  2. A) as well b) too c) and so on d) either

  3. A) Polly can reply b) Polly could reply c) Polly could replied d) there was no reply

  4. A) round and looked b) around her and saw c) round and saw d) round and saw at

  5. A) am mistaken b) am mistaking c) made a mistake d) had been mistaken


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true? The action takes place ____.

  1. at the airport

  2. in the post office

  3. in the shop

  4. at the railway station

  1. Why did so many people pay attention to Polly?

  1. Polly was beautiful.

  2. Polly was a famous film star.

  3. They took her for a film star.

  4. Polly pretended to be a film star.

  1. What was Polly’s reaction to the crowd of people with cameras?

  1. She thought it was nice to imagine that she looked like a film star.

  2. She was frightened.

  3. She was at a loss.

  4. She greeted the crowd.

  1. Polly was asked:

  1. About her health.

  2. If she was a film star.

  3. About the actress who was on the same flight.

  4. If she had a good flight and if she had been to England before.

  1. Why didn’t Polly explain everything to those who took her for the film star?

  1. She liked that so many people paid attention to her.

  2. She didn’t have time to reply.

  3. She didn’t know what to say.

  4. She was afraid to speak.









TEST 13


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


__1__ from death.

The other day I read a story about how parachutist John Marx __2__ death by seconds when he was doing his first ever parachute jump. Apparently John and his instructor Pete Richards had been attached together and were going to come down using the same parachute. Unfortunately __3__ they were jumping from the plane Pete was knocked unconscious. So John found himself and Pete falling to earth at 125 mph with no idea how to open the parachute! __4__ another parachutist Ronnie Borne who was in the middle of his own sky dive saw what was happening.

Ronnie __5__ to fly over to John and Pete and with only ten seconds to spare he succeeded in getting their parachute to open allowing them to land safely to the ground.

  1. A) run b) drug c) escape d) transform

  2. A) helped b) heard c) was d) avoided

  3. A) as b) though c) since d) for

  4. A) unfortunately b) luckily c) bad luck d) lucky man

  5. A) caught b) managed c) surprised d) awoke



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Parachutist John Marx wrote about his experience of parachute jump with Ronnie Burne when they were attached together.

  2. When John Marx was doing his first parachute jump, he nearly died.

  3. Both Pete Richards and his student intended to use the same parachute.

  4. Ronnie Burne had only seconds to help John and Pete.

  1. What happened to John Marx and Pete Richards?

  1. John found Pete but not the idea of opening the parachute.

  2. Their parachute was out of order – they couldn’t open it.

  3. At 125 mph it was impossible to open the parachute.

  4. John Marx was inexperienced – he couldn’t open the parachute without his instructor’s help.

  1. How did Ronnie Burne happen to be near the unfortunate parachute jumpers?

  1. He was a member of the rescue team.

  2. He was jumping with the parachute nearby.

  3. He was able to see what was happening from the flying field.

  4. He was in the middle of the sky.

  1. How did John Marx and Pete Richards manage to land safely to the ground?

  1. Ronnie Burne allowed them to use his parachute.

  2. Ronnie Burne opened their parachute.

  3. Pete Richards succeeded in opening his parachute.

  4. The parachute didn’t open but the unfortunate jumpers landed safely to the ground.

  1. The verb to attach means:

  1. To choose, to decide

  2. To fasten or to join

  3. To behave

  4. To conclude



TEST 14


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


The adopted twins.

In 1939nin Piqua, Ohio, identical new-born twins were adopted by two families who __1__ that the other baby had died. The Springers lived in Dayton, the Lewises in Lima, 80 miles away.

Six years later Mrs. Lewis learnt by accident that the other twin was __2__ and was also called James.

James Springer grew up thinking his twin was dead, __3__ James Lewis didn’t know where his twin was and hesitated for many years before looking for him through the jungle of adopting courts.

In 1979 they met. In their lives apart, the two James had married and divorced Lindas and had remarried Betties; and had taken holidays on the same beach in Florida. __4__ had had the police training. One is now a security guard, the other is a records clerk. When they met, their families noted similar speech patterns and mannerism. __5__ James Lewis had short hair combed back and James Springer had long hair combed forward...

  1. A) talked b) invented c) discovered d) were told

  2. A) dead b) alive c) healthy d) live

  3. A) so b) though c) while d) although

  4. A) both b) some c) both they d) some of the twins

  5. A) also b) besides c) still d) but



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. When the twins met, they found they had both been married to women called Linda.

  2. They had had the police training and worked as security guards.

  3. They spoke and acted in a similar way.

  4. The twins met at the age of 40.

  1. Where did James Lewis look for his brother?

  1. Through the formalities in courts.

  2. In the jungle.

  3. On the beach in Florida.

  4. Among security guards and records clerks.

  1. How many years since their adoption have passed when they met at last?

  1. 40

  2. 6

  3. 46

  4. 36

  1. How was it possible to tell the twins apart?

  1. By the direction of their combs.

  2. They had different hand-writing.

  3. Their names were different.

  4. By their hair-styles

  1. The word twin means:

  1. A model of a baby or person, usually for a child to play with.

  2. Either of two children or animal born together of the same mother.

  3. Person united to others by membership of the same society or profession.

  4. A son of the same parents as another person.



TEST 15


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Chance encounter.

Perhaps the most remarkable tale of a chance encounter is __1__ of Roger Lousier. At the age of four, he strayed away from his mother along the beach at Salem, Massachusetts. He paddled for a while and then got caught by a powerful undercurrent, and would have drowned __2__ for a woman who brought him ashore and revived him. The rescuer refused all rewards.

Nine years later, Roger was tracking a shoal of bluefish when he saw that a heavily-built man __3__ from his powerboat and was floundering helplessly. He paddled his raft over in time to clutch the drowning man’s hand, and kept him afloat until another boat got to them, and they went safely ashore.

In the hospital a woman kissed the boy, “I’m Alice Blaise and I __4__ for saving my Bob”. It was only during a presentation by the Massachusetts Humane Society, that Roger learnt that he had saved the husband of the woman who had saved him on the same beach __5__.

  1. A) one b) this c) encounter d) that

  2. A) but b) except c) with the help d) looking

  3. A) fell b) had fallen c) was fallen d) had felt

  4. A) can’t thank you enough

  1. Can thank you enough

  2. Can’t enough thank you

  3. Can’t say enough thanks

  1. A) after 9 years ago b) in 9 years c) 9 years previously d) at 9 years




PART B



Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Roger Lousier nearly drowned because of the undercurrent.

  2. The rescuer went ashore with the four-year old Roger.

  3. Roger Lousier rushed to the beach to save the husband of the woman who had saved him.

  4. Massachusetts Human Society arranged a presentation.

  1. Why did Bob Blaise begin to drown?

  1. Bob couldn’t help looking at the bluefish Roger was tracking.

  2. Bob fell from his boat.

  3. Bob tried to get into the raft.

  4. The powerboat was built heavily.

  1. How did Roger Lousier save Bob?

  1. Roger kept him afloat as long as he could and another boat took them ashore.

  2. Roger’s raft got him safely ashore.

  3. Bob’s powerboat got to them.

  4. Alice Blaise helped Roger save her husband.

  1. What was Alice Blaise’s reaction to what Roger did?

  1. She was indifferent enough for saving Bob.

  2. She was very grateful.

  3. She didn’t thank Roger.

  4. She couldn’t be grateful.

  1. The word encounter means:

  1. Charm, delight.

  2. A person who rescues a person or a thing.

  3. A sudden or unexpected meeting.

  4. Position, character.











Unit IV.

Stories of all kinds.


TEST 1


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


From the history of Cambridge University.

Cambridge is famous __1__ the world as one of the two oldest university cities in Britain – Oxford, of course, is the other? Its streets are packed with students going about their business on bicycles.

The story of the university began in 1209 when students and scholars __2__ the little town of Cambridge after they had walked 60 miles from Oxford. These students had been students in Oxford where was constant trouble between the people living in the town and the students. Then one day a student accidentally killed a man of the town. The Mayor arrested three __3__ students who were innocent and they __4__ death. In protest all the students moved __5__, some coming to Cambridge, and so the new University began.

  1. A) through b) on c) throughout d) out of

  2. A) arrived in b) reached in c) arrived to d) was arrived at

  3. A) another b) the other c) others d) other

  4. A) put it b) were put to c) put to d)were put at

  5. A) anywhere b) to somewhere c) in nowhere d) elsewhere



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.


  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Cambridge and Oxford are the oldest universities in Britain.

  2. You can see a few students going about their business on bicycles in Cambridge.

  3. The first students and scholars came to Cambridge 791 years ago.

  4. The first students of Cambridge were the former students of Oxford.

  1. How did the story of Cambridge University begin?

  1. It began as soon as the first settlers of the little town of Cambridge arrived.

  2. The story dates back to 1209 when students from London University had to leave it and move to Cambridge.

  3. The story of Cambridge University was connected with the events in Oxford 791 years ago when the students there decided to leave the city.

  4. The story of Cambridge University began when the Mayor of Oxford asked the students from Oxford University to move to Cambridge.

  1. What do you think about the relations that were among the citizens of Oxford and the students of Oxford University? Which of these words describes it best?

  1. Peaceful b) warlike c) good-neighborly d) diplomatic

  1. What happened in Oxford one day 791 years ago?

  1. One day a student decided to kill a citizen of Oxford and killed him.

  2. Once a citizen of Oxford killed a student.

  3. It so happened that a student from Oxford University killed a citizen of Oxford – he didn’t do it on purpose.

  4. The Mayor of Oxford killed a student.

  1. What made the students of Oxford University leave Oxford?

  1. The accident took place in Oxford in 1209 – the arrest and death of innocent students.

  2. The fact that the Mayor arrested the guilty students.

  3. Cambridge University was better than Oxford University.

  4. The Mayor of Oxford asked them to do it.



TEST 2


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B




Barbara Cartland, the Queen of Romance.

Barbara Cartland is known both in Britain and in the United States as «Еру Queen of Romance’. She __1__ by her publisher as “the world’s most famous romantic novelist” but she is many other things __2__.

According to the Guinness book of records she is the world’s most prolific writer, still __3__ a new book every two weeks, and hold the record as the world’s top-selling author, having sold some 30 million copies of her books. She wrote her first book when she was twenty-one and it sold out as soon as it reached the shops. __4__ she was written over 500 books.

She married in 1927, and after she divorced her first husband, she remarried in 1936. In 196, she wrote twenty-one book and __5__ the world record, and shortly after this she sang an album of love songs with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

  1. A) is described b) described c) has described d) is describing

  2. A) as also b) well c) as well d) also

  3. A) having produced b) producing c) produces d) produced

  4. A) after that b) since then c) at that time d) then

  5. A) was broken b) breaks c) broke out d) broke



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Barbara Cartland has sold 370 million copies of her books.

  2. At the beginning of her career she sang an album of love songs with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

  3. Barbara Cartland is famous s “The Queen oа Romance”.

  4. Barbara Cartland is the top-selling author.

  1. What is the theme of Barbara Carland’s books?

  1. Her books are about love.

  2. The main theme of Barbara Cartland’s books is war.

  3. Her books are devoted to the English history.

  4. The books are connected with the album of love songs she sang with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

  1. How does Barbara Cartland’s publisher describe her?

  1. As a world traveler.

  2. As a love-story writer and TV personality.

  3. As the world’s most known romantic novelist.

  4. As a singer of love songs.

  1. When did Barbara Cartland divorce her first husband?

  1. In 1927.

  2. In 1936.

  3. At the time between 1927 and 1936.

  4. In 1976.

  1. Why is Barbara Cartland included in the Guinness Book of Records?

  1. She’s the only British author who sang an album of love songs.

  2. She’s both a writer and TV personality.

  3. She wrote her first book when she was twenty-one.

  4. She writes more books than other writers and her books are sold better than books of other writers.



TEST 3


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


The warship Mary Rose.

The warship Mary Rose was built in the years 1509-10. In 1544 England started a war against France, and in 1545 French ships were sent __1__ the Channel towards England. Some English ships went out from Portsmouth to meet them. One of those ships was the Mary Rose. It was carrying 91 guns and 700 men – twice __2__ as normal. It sank quickly to the bottom of the sea even before it was attacked by the French. About 650 men __3__. The king of England himself saw this terrible accident.

The next month an attempt __4__ to raise the Mary Rose, but it failed. The ship was forgotten for hundreds of years.

The ship was lifted out of the sea in October 1982. Many people saw the raising of the Mary Rose on television. __5__ the ship was taken into Portsmouth dock 437 years after she had sunk.

  1. A) to b) across c) on d) in

  2. A) many b) more c) as much d) as many

  3. A) were died b) dead c) were dead d) died

  4. A) has made b) make c) was made d) made

  5. A) Finally b) Last c) In the final d) Lately



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The ship sank because it was attacked by the French.

  2. The Mary Rose was built before the war against France.

  3. The King of England invited them.

  4. France started a war against England.

  1. What happened to the people on board the Mary Rose?

  1. All the people sank.

  2. Most people died, only 50 people died.

  3. Most people survived, only 50 people survived.

  4. 500 people died, 100 people survived.

  1. Why were the French ships sent towards England?

  1. It happened because England started a war against France.

  2. They were tourist ships.

  3. The King of England invited them.

  4. France started a war against England.

  1. When was the first attempt made to raise the ship?

  1. In 1545 b) in 1509 c) in 1982 d) in 1510

  1. What was with the Mary Rose after the first attempt to raise the ship failed?

  1. Attempts to raise the Mary Rose have been made many times since them.

  2. The ship was taken into London dock and made into a museum.

  3. The ship was raised 2 years after the first attempt had failed.

  4. The ship was forgotten for hundreds of years.


TEST 4


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B



Traffic lights.

The first traffic signal was invented by a railway signaling engineer. It was installed __1__ the Houses of Parliament in 1868. It looked like any railway signal of the time, and was operated by gas. However, it exploded and killed a policemen, and the accident __2__ further development until cars became common. Modern traffic lights are an American __3__. Red-green systems were installed in 1914. Three-color signals, operated by hand from a tower in the middle of the street, were installed in New York in 1918. The first lights of this type in Britain were in London on the junction between St. James’s Street and Piccadilly, in 1925.

In the past, traffic lights were __4__. In New York, some lights had a statue on top. In Los Angeles the lights didn’t just change __5__ but rang bells to wake the sleeping motorists of the 1930s. These are gone and have been replaced by standard models, which are universally adopted.

  1. A) inside b) in c) outside d) in front

  2. A) discouraged b) disappointed c) displeased d) disarmed

  3. A) discovery b) puzzle c) intelligence d) invention

  4. A) tragic b) useless c)active d) special

  5. A) loudly b) silently c) slowly d) quickly


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The first traffic signal was the cause of death of a British policeman.

  2. The first traffic signal was invented in the Houses of Parliament.

  3. The first traffic signal didn’t look like the traffic lights of today.

  4. The first traffic signal was placed near the Palace of Westminster.

  1. What are traffic lights?

  1. Special signal controlling road traffic by colored lights.

  2. Movement of cars along roads.

  3. An official controlling over the movement of cars.

  4. Regulation of traffic with the help of colored lights.

  1. Whom do we owe the traffic lights of the type we use now to?

  1. Americans.

  2. Members of Parliament from Westminster Palace.

  3. British.

  4. Sleeping motorists.

  1. Why was the changing of the traffic lights followed by the bells in 1930s?

  1. To break the silence of Los Angeles at night.

  2. To wake the sleeping drivers.

  3. To replace the standard models of the time.

  4. To keep step with the time.

  1. The word junction means:

  1. A narrow country road.

  2. The main public road, main route.

  3. A paved way at the side of a street for people on foot.

  4. A place where roads meet or diverge.


TEST 5


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Pilot holds New York Hostage.

The first word of __1__ came at 10.20 a.m. when a police department official telephoned the United Nations and informed the Secretary General that a lunatic pilot in the area planned __2__ his plane into the UN building.

The UN was evacuated, fire teams moved into the UN grounds to cope with the disaster.

Then the police corrected their __3__ report. The target of the pilot, Richard Boudin, was not the UN, but the publishing company, housed in a building two blocks from the UN.

Mr. Boudin apparently felt that his novel, “Confessions of a Counterfeiter”, was not getting enough publicity, __4__ he chartered the plane at a New Jersey airport and radioed that he was going to destroy the publishing house.

Soon __5__ the president of the publishing company agreed to talk with Mr. Boudin, if he would land at La Guardian Airport. Mr. Boudin accepted and flew off, the crisis over.

Police said Mr. Boudin would be charged with endangerment and other offences.

  1. A) the threat b) the gossip c) the rumor d) the history

  2. A) to sit b) to beat c) to take off d) to fly

  3. A) primitive b) pilot c) original d) hostage

  4. A) because b) so c) however d) besides

  5. A) afternoon b) after noon c) after these d) towards noon



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. The text is a description of the incident in which dissatisfied writer was going to crash his aircraft into a New York building.

  2. Mr. Boudin was to be accused.

  3. Mr. Boudin was in danger and offended with the charge.

  4. Measures were taken to prevent the disaster in the UN area.

  1. The lunatic pilot:

  1. Was to be taken to the lunatic asylum.

  2. Tended to act at nights, being a lunatic.

  3. Moved fire teams onto the UN grounds.

  4. Held New York terrified.

  1. Why did the publishing company become the target of the pilot?

  1. Mr. Boudin probably thought the publishing house didn’t provide his novel with enough information to attract public attention.

  2. The police corrected Mr. Boudin’s intention and changed their report.

  3. There were no fire teams in the neighborhood.

  4. The publishing house was only two blocks from the UN.

  1. Who was going to negotiate with Mr. Boudin?

  1. The police.

  2. The UN Secretary General.

  3. The counterfeiter.

  4. The president of the publishing company.

  1. The word hostage means:

  1. One held as a guarantee that certain terms will be satisfied.

  2. A highly nervous person.

  3. Hostile.

  4. Person in danger.












TEST 6


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Lightning strike (1).

It is not surprising that people in the past were afraid of lightning. We still find lightning thrilling and fascinating. Scientists are trying to predict storms and protect people __1__ lightning strikes.

Things used to be much __2__. According to research by Dr. Derek Elsom the number of fatalities has dropped by 80 per cent since the mid-1850s. this isn’t because lightning is less __3__, but because fewer people now work in the open. The experience of Roy Sullivan goes to show how dangerous it can be to work __4__.

Roy, a former park ranger in Virginia, USA, held the world record for being struck by lightning. He was first hit in 1942, losing just the nail from his big toe! He was struck again in 1969, 1970 and 1973. In 1976 a strike hurt his ankle and in 1977 he suffered chest and stomach burns. After __5__ all this he killed himself in 1983!

  1. A) before b) against c) for d) after

  2. A) worse b) better c) less d) fewer

  3. A) furor b) open c) average d) common

  4. A) inside b) upside c) outside d) downside

  5. A) striking b) lightning c) surviving d) living


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Dr. Derek Elsom was engaged in research into lightning strikes prediction.

  2. Scientists are making efforts to predict storms.

  3. We are still looking for thrill and fascination in lightning.

  4. People are known to be as much afraid of lightning in the remote past as they are now.

  1. According to D. Derek Elsom’s research:

  1. The number of misfortunes caused by lightning strikes has fallen since the mid-1850s.

  2. Strikes are not as fatal as they were until 1850.

  3. The number of fatalists has dropped by 80 per cent since thee mid-1850s.

  4. The less people work in the open, the more fatal lightning strikes become.

  1. What happened to Roy Sullivan?

  1. He committed suicide.

  2. He has been struck by lightning thrice.

  3. In 1976 his ankle was injured. Hence he suffered chest and stomach burns.

  4. He set up the world record in lightning.

  1. What other title could you give to the story?

  1. Lightning on strike.

  2. Lightning: experience and research.

  3. Invisible but dangerous strikes.

  4. Predictions and reality as seen by the former park ranger.

  1. The word ranger means:

  1. Dangerous park experience.

  2. An experience worker.

  3. A former showman.

  4. A keeper of a (royal) park, who sees that the forest laws are observed.


TEST 7


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Lightning strike (2).

It is not surprising that people in the past were afraid of lightning and thought it was a sign of anger from their gods. We still find lightning thrilling and fascinating. It is now also an important area of research for scientists, who are trying to __1__ its secrets and are looking for ways to predict lightning strikes and protect people.

Predicting when and where lightning is likely to strike is one of the ways we have made it __2__ of a danger. Forecasting lightning is taken most seriously in America. But even the most __3__ forecasting systems can sometimes be caught out. In March 1993, Florida and other states of America were struck __4__ severe lightning storms. At the peak the “Sunshine state” was hit by 5,000 strikes an hour. The cause oа the storm and the reason it suddenly died out as it travelled north, is yet another mystery of the lightning __5__.

  1. A) over b) invent c) uncover d) recover

  2. A) less b) more c) least d) a little

  3. A) undeveloped b) usual c) common d) advanced

  4. A) out b) by c) with d) of

  5. A) phenomenon b) secret c) illusion d) riddle


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Secrets of lightning are yet to be revealed.

  2. Long ago gods were believed to show their anger by sending lightning.

  3. We are still looking for lightning and find it: thrilling and exciting.

  4. The importance of research into lightning should not be underestimated.

  1. Predicting the time and place of lightning:

  1. Can sometimes be caught out by forecasting systems.

  2. Is taken for granted in America and most forecasting systems.

  3. Has made it not so dangerous as it had been before.

  4. Is like lightning.

  1. The cause of the storm in the “Sunshine state”.

  1. Suddenly died out.

  2. Is unknown.

  3. Travelled north.

  4. Was nit by 5,000 strikes an hour.

  1. What other heading would you give to the story?

  1. The devil is not so black as he is painted.

  2. Lightning: myth and reality.

  3. Mysteries of lightning to be solved.

  4. Lightning on strike.

  1. The word lightning means:

  1. A source of light.

  2. Illumination during strikes.

  3. Striking light.

  4. A large scale high tension natural electric discharge in the atmosphere.

TEST 8


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


Lightning strike (3).

It is not surprising that people in the past were afraid of lightning and thought it was a sign of anger from their gods. We still find lightning thrilling and fascinating.

Up until the 18th century people were given __2__ proof that lightning really can strike the same place twice. Between 1388 and 1762, the famous bell tower of San Marco in Venice, was severely __3__ or completely destroyed nine times. In England and Wales things are not quite as bad as they were in Italy, but about a dozen people are struck by lightning every year and a quarter of __4__ are killed as a result. Men are six times more likely to be struck by lightning than women.

Lightning is an important area of __5__ for scientists, who are looking for ways to predict storms and protect people.

  1. A) in fact b) as a fact c) factually d) in practice

  2. A) different b) another c) dramatic d) the same

  3. A) hurt b) wounded c) injured d) damaged

  4. A) it b) this c) that d) those

  5. A) research b) search c) opening d) fortune telling



PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. In the faraway past gods were believed to get angry.

  2. The more thrilling and fascinating lightning becomes the more thrilled people get by this sign of god’s anger.

  3. It is only natural that people in the past were afraid of lightning.

  4. People are still excited by lightning.

  1. What proof were people given until the eighteenth century?

  1. The same place or not, it can be struck.

  2. People could witness lightning twice, sometimes nine times.

  3. Bell towers in Venice could become famous due to lightning strikes between 1388 and 1762.

  4. A place can be hit by lightning more than once.

  1. Where did people run the risk of lightning strikes more often?

  1. In England: men were six times more likely to be struck by lightning than women.

  2. In Wales: women were six times less likely to be struck by lightning than men.

  3. In Italy.

  4. In famous bell towers; as often as nine times.

  1. What title would you give to the story?

  1. Lightning strike.

  2. Lightning on strike.

  3. Enlightenment on lightning.

  4. Lightning: pros and cons.

  1. The word severely means:

  1. Favorably b) extremely c) little d) fortunately.


TEST 9


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


How to boost your memory.

Are you forgetful? There’s a tremendous range of methods to boost your memory.

Your memory is like a brilliant, but __1__ computer storing a vast amount of information. In fact the memory’s capacity is theoretically unlimited. __2__ only about 20 percent of our daily experience is registered, and of that only a tiny proportion is loaded into long-term memory.

Normal healthy people can improve their memories easily. First of all learn to relax if you are trying to memorize something. You may __3__ important items if your mind is on something else or if you weren’t paying attention because of anxiety. Try to combine study with exercise. Keep your mind fit __4__ your body by doing mental workouts. Crosswords, scrabbles and quizzes all help to keep the mind in shape. You can also train your memory systems called mnemonics, and they still work today. Most systems involve associating the things you want to remember with something you already have safely stored in your head. For example, if you want to remember numbers try to make associations between numbers in sequence – think of people’s ages, special dates, whether they’re odd or even.

  1. A) unreliable b) expensive c) reasonable d) powerful

  2. A) besides b) moreover c) likewise d) nevertheless

  3. A) catch b) pick up c) miss d) get

  4. A) alike b) as well as c) well as d) or

  5. A) ways b) tricks c) methods d) schemes


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Unbounded ability of people’s memory can be developed or trained.

  2. Memory’s capacity is theoretically unlimited but practically it is restricted to 20 % of what is loaded into long-term memory.

  3. People’s memory can be compared with a computer storing information.

  4. To get rid of forgetfulness one can use a series of methods.

  1. Relaxation may:

  1. Be helpful when memorizing something.

  2. Be an important item if your mind is on something else.

  3. Keep your body fir for scrabbles, crosswords, and quizzes.

  4. Combine study with exercise.

  1. What are memory systems mostly based on?

  1. Sequence of numbers.

  2. Mnemonics.

  3. Associations.

  4. Safe storage of information.

  1. What title could you give to the story?

  1. Memorial systems of ancient Greeks still at work.

  2. How to boost your memory.

  3. Long life to long-term memory.

  4. Forget-me-not: unlimited capacity of memory.

  1. The word capacity means:

  1. A feature of forgetful people.

  2. An ability to receive, hold or absorb.

  3. Characteristics of memorabilia.

  4. Horizons of unlimited memory.


TEST 10


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


When a computer error is a fatal mistake.

Life without computers has become __1__. They are designed to look after so many boring but essential things that we have become dependent on them. But __2__ the demands placed on computers grow, so does the number of incidents involving computer errors. It is only a matter of time before a computer-made catastrophe occurs. As early as 1889, a word entered the language that was to become all too familiar to computer scientists: a “bug”, meaning a mistake. For decades bugs and “debugging” were taken to be part of every computer engineer’s.

Of course, more often than not errors are __4__ annoying, but sometimes they can come close to causing tragedies. On the Piccadilly line in London’s Underground a driver who was going south along a track got confused while moving his empty train through a cross-over point. He started to head north straight at a south bound train full of people. The computerized signaling system __5__ to warn him of impending disaster and it was only his quick human reactions that prevented a crash.

  1. A) elementary b) unimaginable c) tireless d) trivial

  2. A) however b) no sooner c) in the meantime d) as

  3. A) job b) tragedy c) necessity d) action

  4. A) not b) not only c) just d) absolutely

  5. A) managed b) signaled c) failed d) succeeded


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. Try as you might, you can hardly manage without computers in modern world.

  2. No matter how boring computers might be, their demands grow.

  3. Sooner or later, the number of incidents involving computer errors is expected to increase.

  4. In the course of time computers are supposed to do more and more demanding job.

  1. In the faraway year of 1889 the word “bug”:

  1. Appeared in the language.

  2. Was used by mistake.

  3. And “computer” were synonyms to computer scientists and entered their language and life.

  4. Familiarized computer scientists with “de-bugging”.

  1. What kept the catastrophe in the subway from happening?

  1. The driver’s prompt actions.

  2. The computerized signaling actions.

  3. Humane reaction.

  4. Signals of the driver.

  1. What title could you give to the story?

  1. When a computer error is a fatal mistake.

  2. Growing demands on computer errors.

  3. Annoying bugs.

  4. De-bugging in London Underground.

  1. The word impending means:

  1. Crashed

  2. Reasonable.

  3. Looking forward.

  4. Approaching, going to happen.


TEST 11


PART A.

Directions (Question 1-5).

Fill in the gaps in the text with one of the four choices given below. Choose the correct answer and mark it on your answer sheet. The example shows you what to do.

Example: He __1__ a lovely holiday in the country last year.

  1. Bought b) had c) passed d) gave

Answer: 1. B


What is this thing called love?

Love is remarkably __1__: in the survey of 1991 only one in five of the 1, 000 people interviewed said they were “not really in love”. To many researches the classic __2__ of rapid pulse and legs turning to jelly are far from mysterious. Many think it can all be explained by our biochemistry.

Scientists __3__ the excitement of that fatal attraction is created by adrenalin. The adrenalin glands produce a hormone, whose side-effects include feelings of great happiness.

People are often attracted to others who have a lot in common with them – even if they don’t always realize that they have anything in common. Facial attractiveness is a big influence on the __4__ of partners, too. According to recent study, people have long-lasting relationships with others of a similar level of attractiveness.

__5__ the explanation for how and why we fall in love, one thing is clear: Nature has made the whole thing as wonderful and addictive as possible.

  1. A) rare b) agreeable c) common d) average

  2. A) bits b) symptoms c) recipe d) proof

  3. A) believe b) uncovered c) provide d) invented

  4. A) alternative b) face c) race d) choice

  5. A) however b) whatever c) naturally d) whatever


PART B


Directions (Questions 6-10)

Questions 6 through 10 are based on the text you’ve read in Part A of this Section. Choose the one best answer to each question on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.

Mark the answer on your answer sheet.

  1. Which of the following is not true?

  1. According to investigation of 1991, 200 out of 1000 people interviewed said they were “not really in love”.

  2. Love is remarkable, jelly-like and far from mysteries.

  3. Many scientists suppose that it is possible to explain love by the chemistry of biological processes and substances.

  4. To many researchers rapid pulse and legs turning to jelly my be indications of love.

  1. It is:

  1. The hormone that produces biochemistry.

  2. The survey of 1991 that revealed connections between happiness and biochemistry.

  3. Only the facial attractiveness that matters to researchers.

  4. Adrenalin that accounts for the excitement of the “fatal attraction”.

  1. What do the words the whole thing refer to in the last paragraph of the text?

  1. Feelings of great happiness.

  2. Wonders of the world.

  3. Love

  4. Love surveys.

  1. What title could you give to the story?

  1. To love or not to love.

  2. Evidence of love.

  3. Love and attraction of scientists.

  4. What is this thing called love?

  1. The word side-effect means:

  1. A meaningless effect

  2. A secondary effect

  3. A mutual effect

  4. An exotic effect































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